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Thread: AFB and no flow

  1. #1
    Just checked some of colonies for fall/winter prep and found 3 with AFB. I always thought of trying the shake onto new equipment method - but no nectar flow. Can I simply use tylosin with the diseased comb and possibly diseased honey? If it were earlier in the year I would attempt this and cull the scaled comb over time. I'm halfway tempted torch the colonies because it seems unlikely they will survive the winter anyhow. Strange thing is the colonies are very strong - loads of bees and brood still - probably robbed some nearby diseased hive.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Fruitland ,Idaho
    Posts
    419

    Post

    If your sure it's AFB burn it. This will save you lots of headaches later on.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,380

    Post

    If you have them tested and they are positive AFB then please do yourself and all of the beekeepers in the area a great service, burn the frames and scorch the boxes.
    To everything there is a season....

  4. #4

    Post

    Do you torch the bees as well? Shake them out? Will they carry spores to neighbouring colonies?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    Get a definitive diagnosis first.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6

    Post

    No sunken caps or stinky-sticky larvae, but loads of scale. I am well versed no how to recognize scale, but for some reason the toothpick test fails.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Beverly, Mass
    Posts
    298

    Post

    AFB is like a tumor you need to destroy it as soon as posible or it'll spread. Pay now or pay later.

  8. #8

    Post

    do i burn the hive w/ bees?
    shake the bees, burn the frames, torch the box?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    Burn comb and bees, give the inside of the box a good scorching with a torch.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    399

    Post

    I think you should kill the bees first (with soapy water the evening before)

    From the MAAREC website-
    Control: Sanitation and elimination of disease reservoirs
    is a necessity for adequate control of American
    foulbrood. The traditional control measure is to
    kill all bees in an affected colony and then destroy
    bees and their comb by burning. The hive bodies, bottom
    board and covers can be salvaged by scraping thoroughly
    and then charring the inside portions and/or
    boiling in a lye solution.

    Hope you get out of it with the least damage
    There is no greater satisfaction than the satisfaction of a job well done.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Post

    Burn everything.

    Thing is, when your treated hive fails later on, your neighbouring bees will rob the AFB back to thier colonies. Then your problem turns into their problem also.

    Dont treat a known hive with antibiotics. I think this is one of the most worst things you could do.

    Burn the hives!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    You have scale but no ropiness? Have you considered Parafoulbrood a possibility? I'd send some to Beltsville for a definitive diagnosis. http://www.ba.ars.usda.gov/psi/brl/directs.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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