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Thread: Apiguard

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Evansville, IN, USA
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    AndrewSchwab . . .

    >maybe squeaked 60 degrees . . .
    >not quite double . . .
    >bees really haven't touched the stuff . . .

    Sounds like you need a bit warmer weather.


    >trays are in just below the screen maybe 1/4 . . .

    Probably OK, but I would seal a 1/4" crack just to be sure.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Raleigh, North Carolina
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    Dave,

    I've mentioned this before
    it was kinda odd
    I was seeing around 20 mites/day
    it was early August, prime mite breeding season, and it worried me
    I put in the Apiguard and never really saw a big mite fall
    you keep the sticky board in so you'd think you'd see all that fall
    I must admit to being less than a meticulous mite counter but I never saw a large drop, they just kinda went away
    my "tongue in check" theory is it stinks so much the mites absconded [img]smile.gif[/img]
    I'm just glad they're gone

    another interesting note
    I dug thru that hive today looking for a frame of capped brood to give to a nuc I'm starting
    I was very surprised how little brood I found
    there's a dearth going on here and I think the queen has just shutdown
    no doubt that has something to do with the mite situation
    I guess I'm gonna have to feed em to get em thru winter

    Dave

    [size="1"][ September 02, 2006, 04:24 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cooperstown,N.Y.
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    I just got a reply to my e-mail from Max Watkins at Vita...err...I mean,I just got some connection issues corrected,so that I could get to read my e-mail.

    The reason for not using Apiguard DURING A HONEYFLOW is due to U.S. reg's. and no other reason.

    The honey/pollen that is stored during the treatment period is supposed to be O.K. for wintering,the amount of thymol after evaporating(sublimating)to be almost nothing,and the honey is used by the bees,not for extraction and human consumption.


    He say's to but the Apiguard ON THE BROOD NEST...IE:in a 2 story hive you put it between the two story,in a 3 story between the middle and top. Hobie's right,I was wrong.I will try it their way on the rest.

    Mode of action,Protein denaturant.
    It destroy's cell walls and interupts chemical processes,and may cause aphyxiation.

    And he say's that a super that was used during a treatment,when empty and allowed to air out over the winter(or a length of time) is fine to use for honey storage at a later time.

    BTW,I did cork my auger holes and remove the shims under my plwood tops.
    One colony dragged out the foil for me after 3 days.

    Here's Hoping it's as good as we Hope it is.
    Mark

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Surrey,UK
    Posts
    26

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    Hi all
    I've used Api Gaurd for a couple of seasons and it works very well. FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS VERY CLOSELY.!!! AND DON'T CUT CORNERS BY NOT USING THE SECOND TRAY.

    Do not use it with honey supers on as your honey will taste of Thymol!!!!!!!!!

    Drobbins Api Gaurd does somtimes stop a queen laying for a short period and I have noticed this several times. They normaly sort this out when they get used to it.

    Regards Ian

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Raleigh, North Carolina
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    Ian

    since you have more experience than I, a question for you
    The reply that Mark got from Vita doesn't agree with the way I interpret the label
    this may have to do with terminology so let me describe what I'm saying
    to me, when you have removed all your supers, what's left is the "broodnest"
    others may use different terminology, they may still have a "broodnest" plus some honey storage area, I'm not sure
    but around here, let's say the "broodnest" consists of two boxes
    where would you place the Apiguard?
    I'm under the impression you should use some kind of shim to create a little extra space above the top box and put it there, the extra space being so the bees have room to get to the top of the tray
    the reply Mark got from Vita seems to say otherwise
    what do folks do on your side of the pond [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

    [size="1"][ September 04, 2006, 02:15 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  6. #46
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    Well, I guess I'll be experimenting with Apigaurd with top entrances late in the season. It shouldn't really be necessary for the bees to drag the substance Through the hive as Apilife-VAR does not require the bees to touch it. As long as its evaporating and filling the hive with the fumes it should work, as far as I can tell. I haven't used Apigaurd yet, but Apilife was so pungent that I'm sure Apigaurd can really kick on its own too.

    FYI Dadant is out of the tubs. They are expecting them mid-September, if they don't get them I have to go with plan B. Night lows are already in the 60's here which is the lower limit.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Surrey,UK
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    26

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    Hi Drobbins
    You've got it spot on thats exactly how your ment to use it. We can get big tubs of the stuff and somtimes just neasure from a scoop onto a thin piece of rigid foil/card. So no need for a shim under the crown board. You can also just flatten the edges of the tray.

    Although you should pay close attention to the temp when using Api Gaurd Trials in Canada Have shown reduced mite counts on hives with trays left on over winter.(DON'T COUNT ON THIS)

    The fumes do sink and all SBB SHOULD BE CLOSED COMPLETLY.

    All things considered it's good stuff it does also seem to reduce chalk brood and promote good hive hygiene.

    Normaly if the bees are'nt removing it it's because it's to cold or there is to much ventilation and the fumes are not building up in the hive.

    Regards Ian

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    >>Mode of action,Protein denaturant.
    >>It destroy's cell walls and interupts chemical
    >>processes,and may cause aphyxiation.

    Hopefully asphyxiation of mites only, not bees. I looked at my colony yesterday and noticed bee-battles going on... wondering if this Apiguard is weakening the hive or making the local wild bees think they are weak enough to rob? (I have a very strong wild colony in my barn wall.) I closed the upper entrance and reduced the lower. We'll see what happens.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cooperstown,N.Y.
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    474

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    I sent a quick "Thank You" to the good Dr. Watkins tonight.

    I also shot him a copy of this thread,with an invite to join in.

    Keep tuned...Hmmm

    Mark

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

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    Thanks Mark,

    It'll be interesting to see what he has to say

    Dave

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Surrey,UK
    Posts
    26

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    Hi all

    I found some info if your interested.

    http://www.vita-europe.com/Map_enscr...2Fen%2Ffaq.htm

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