Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,349

    Post

    Apparently SHB have been found in an overwintered colony at the Beaverlodge research station in northern Alberta. The bees came from packages that were purchased from Australia last year (oops!!).

    So I guess that's another reason to open the border to packages from the US of A or to keep every border closed and prevent any movement of any bees anywhere. This of course all depends on which side of the fence you happen to be on.

    The one thing that could help cooler heads from prevailing is if the other packages that came from that pallet were distributed into B.C. , Alta. and Sask. That way everybody has got some SHB and everybody can then carry on beekeeping instead of worrying about SHB. Anyways this issue will be interesting to follow. I'm not sure the industry has learned anything from the first varroa find in Wisconsin (I think). I did not have bees at the time but I remember Gard Otis walking into the lecture room anouncing that the border had been closed to packages and queens coming from the U.S.A. I did not understand at the time the impact that those words had on peoples lives and businesses. It meant bankruptcy for some, broken families, visits to the funny farm for others. Overall it was very devastating to the industry. Hive counts had been on the rise before the border closure and stopped after it closed. Only recently have hive numbers started to climb in Alberta and that is due to the hybrid canola pollination contracts.

    The way I see it is if I'm Australian it's time to start loosing sleep over this one mate. If I'm an American queen and package producer, well a slight reason for optimism. Don't get to excited, because the wheels of bureaucracy turn ever so slowly over here. I'm sure glad I do not have them yet and more importantly they were found elsewhere first.

    Jean-Marc

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    --Apparently SHB have been found in an overwintered colony at the Beaverlodge research station in northern Alberta. The bees came from packages that were purchased from Australia last year (oops!!).


    Please provied the source for this information.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    Northern Alberta? And they overwintered? WOW!!! That's bad, bad news for those of us still clinging to shreds of hope that our northern winters might prevent them from overwintering successfully.

    We don't (at least officially) have them here in South Dakota, but the migratory 'keepers expect that they've managed to bring some back to share with the rest of us this year.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Post

    We will have to see if they are able to survive year round. Surviving the winter is one thing, establishing themselves is another.

    This pest real concerns me.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    SHB have over-wintered in Pennsylvania for several years. I am not sure how far north others are expecting to have the winters deal with SHB. I can tell you, I don't see "winter" being a solution.

    -SHB over-winter in hives very well.

    -SHB do not need to pupate in the ground. Yes, they may naturally do this, but it is not needed. They will pupate and attach anywhere, just as wax moths caccoons are founf between boxes, under inner covers etc.

    -SHB have been found to take on the hives smell and actually has beem observed begging and receiving food from the bees themselves.

    -SHB has changed drastically in the short period of time concerning northern climate issues. Thinking the northern wineters will take care of SHB is a past thought for me. Beetles are known as survivors and will adapt to the conditions. Conditions inside a hive that survives the winter is not that bad if you think about it. If SHB over-winters in a hive just fine, and they do, does it matter how far "north" you are?

    SHB has demonstrated the ability to fly several miles in one day. If you have not seen SHB, consider yourself lucky. You will have them soon enough.


    SHB in the north may not pose the threat as down south. But dealing with this adaptable pest in the north, will no doubt be part of beekeeping for the future.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,349

    Post

    Well, as far as them coming from austrlia Dan Tegart told me that. Today I spoke with Terry Greidanus. He brokers bees from Australia ( Warren Taylor supplies him). According to Terry the bees would have come from Morley Clark from Saskatchewan. His supplier is Terry Brown(yeah, the same guy who Bob harrison speaks highly of). Morley may have gotten those bees from another supplier, but historically Terry Brown supplied him. If Terry Brown indeed supplied Morley where Terry B. got those bees I have no idea. Typically the exporters of bees will purchase bees from other beekeepers. I guess this all depends on how there bees are doing and how strong the demand for bees is.

    I happen to pollinate canola in southern Alberta and the inspector was over today to check my bees over. He mentioned the find of SHB. Yesterday the provincial apiarist (Medhat Nasr) and the inspectors and beekeepers got together to agree on the grading system of hives. This makes sure there are no unpleasant surprises. Anyway the SHB find was discussed there.

    So currently I'm 99.99999% sure that SHB were found in Beaverlodge and 75% sure that they would have come from an Australian package last year.

    My fear was that people would get all nervous about this and want to start restricting the movement of hives. The canola contract makes or breaks us so I want and need to go there. The seed company wants my bees, so we are in agreement there.

    Jean-Marc

    Unlike Bjornbee I've got some fancy letters after my name but the first ones start with a BS, so go figure.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,349

    Post

    So apparently the beekeepers who purchased Australian packages will have there hives inspected for SHB and the authorities want to monitor the situation. Hopefully this does not turn into a nightmare for beekeepers.

    Jean-Marc

  8. #8

    Post

    SHB aren't any fun.

    I can't help but wonder about California who imported packages from Australia this year to meet the pollination (and avoid the border inspections on the highways for pests such as . . . SHB).

    Has anyone heard about California finding any hives from Australia packages bringing in SHB? This makes me also wonder about pollination contracts in the upcoming years for almonds in California.
    Keith

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Beverly, Mass
    Posts
    303

    Post

    What are the current treatments beside the traps?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    ><Moved to new post
    Waya

    [size="1"][ June 17, 2006, 01:18 AM: Message edited by: wayacoyote ][/size]
    WayaCoyote

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    >SHB have over-wintered in Pennsylvania for several years. I am not sure how far north others are expecting to have the winters deal with SHB. I can tell you, I don't see "winter" being a solution.

    I was putting oiled papers in my screened bottom board trays the other day and in one hive I found a single small hive beetle adult under the screen, and in another I found an ugly mass of small hive beetle larvae rooting around in the hive detritus- perhaps 100 of them or more, and one adult beetle. Both hives overwintered. There's no evidence of SHB actually causing problems in the hives and there likely won't be as long as the hives are healthy and the bees manage to corral the little suckers under the screens [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Dulcius ex asperis

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > Has anyone heard about California finding any
    > hives from Australia packages bringing in SHB?

    Well, it is not just beekeepers in California who
    have chosen to import these bees. While these
    bees are claimed to be from SHB-free areas of
    Australia, no one would know if any of the packages
    were infested with SHB, as there is no inspection
    or even sampling at port-of-entry.

    The WTO "rules" say that the shipper "certifies"
    that the bees are free of diseases and pests.
    That's it. There is no ability for a State
    Apiarist to inspect these bees until after they
    are hived, and after any SHB have had time to
    get a foothold and spread to other hives and
    other apiaries.

    All of this has implications that are not
    obvious, which I wrote about back in Jan of 2005
    http://bee-quick.com/reprints/regs.pdf

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Jim,
    Its the old "slamming the barn door after the cows have gone".

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    307

    Post

    I was at a workshop put on by the Ontario Beekeepers Assoc - Tech Transfer Team last weekend and there are SHBs in the Lake Erie area on the USA side. The
    Province of Ontario Ministry of Agriculture had put traps up along the border and along the shore of Lake Ontario to monitor for them. None yet, but I guess its just a matter of time.

    If they can survive winters in northern PA and OH they will survive on the Canadain side too.
    "hobby farm" is an oxymoron
    Brent Roberts

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads