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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Caledonia, IL
    Posts
    2

    Post

    Does anyone have any ideas. My entire hive left in mid march. Someone suggested it might be the african hive beetle, but I'm not sure. The honey left behind (1 1/2 shallow with some in the deep) was not sour or frothy. I didn't see evidence of the wax being eaten, except in one area where I found a mouse nesting. I didn't find any queen cells. I cleaned the bottom board in early March and the bottom board contained only a few dead bees. Any ideas on what could have caused this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Post

    Any piles of bees outside? They might have just dwindled over the winter. Could have been Tracheal Mites, too, never had them, but heard they cause dwindling.

    Mice never help, either.

    How big was the cluster at the beginning of March?

    -rick

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    Sometimes the die in March. They dwindle too small to survive or they starve because they use up stores rearing brood. They seldom abscond that time of year after overwintering.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Caledonia, IL
    Posts
    2

    Post

    I did notice that it seemed like there was less activity in that hive than my other hive. There were quite a few dead bees after the winter (although they had plenty of food stores. I didn't harvest anything last summer as it was their first year and I wanted to build them up. I wasn't checking for mites last year, but have a screen ordered to start monitoring.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    597

    Post

    Is it possible that bees have moved to next door hive. If colony has no queen, it may happen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

    Post

    This is might be a symptom for a high-infested colony with Varroa mites. Monitor your other hives, bees often leave the infested hive and go (with mites as a backpack) to hives closed by.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    It could also have been infested with TM; this often leads to a gradual die-out in late winter.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

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