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Thread: Deformed Wing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
    Posts
    203

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    Hi,

    I have noticed a large amount of bees sitting on the landing board of one of my hives with there wings in and extended fashion. I moved some to see if they could fly but they ended up on the ground walking round.

    I have never had the deformed wing problem so I am not sure what I should be looking for.
    Does anyone have a picture of this?
    I have done 24hr mite drop and it was real low.

    Thanks,

    Kieran
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

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    Sounds like you may have K wing virus caused by can only bee seen by Trachal mites. The wings on the bees look like they form a K. The T mites can only be seen by disecting the bees and using a 20+ power magnifining glass or a microscope.
    Clnt
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
    Posts
    203

    Post

    Thanks Clint,

    I do not want to use chemicals on my hives, what are my alternatives?
    What happens if I leave alone, do they die out in winter?

    I was thinking of just adding grease patties what do think any use.

    Kieran
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    829

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    I just tested Thymol strips I got from the distributor for oxalic acid vaporizer here. They call them Thymomite and it is a summer treatment right after harvest. I used Thymol crystals the last season after harvest and my bees carried them out, faster then I could put them in the hive. The strips are really helps, it kills Varroa and Tracheal mites but the temperatures should be above 15ºC/59ºF it’s worth to try it.

  5. #5

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    And change the queen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

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    &gt;I have noticed a large amount of bees sitting on the landing board of one of my hives with there wings in and extended fashion.

    I'm not sure what you're describing. But bees have a pair of wings on both sides. Normally these are connected by little hooks on the wings so they appear to be one wing on each side. If you see two distinct wings on both sides and the back one is extended in front of the front one ("K" wing) then it's a sign of tracheal mites. The best thing for that is a queen with tracheal mite resitance.

    If the wings are not seperated into four distinct wings ("K" wing) and they are just clustering on the front, this is just "bearding" which is normal hot weather behavior. They are usully not flying and if they fall on the ground will just crawl back up and not fly. There is nothing wrong with them, they are just dealing with the heat.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
    Posts
    203

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    Thanks Michael,

    I have just finished moving all my hives to feral/survivor colony queens and was worred in case the added stress was causing a tracheal mite problem.

    I was seeing two distinct pairs of wings on both sides but I need to look closer to see if the back ones are extended forward.

    Kieran
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    If they are, you need to requeen. You can treat, I believe (TM isn't a problem in Britain), but there's no need to keep susceptible bees. All you do by treating is perpetuate a situation where part of the population isn't resistant.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  9. #9

    Post

    Just curious, can you tell us how old your queen is?
    I have had that problem that Murphy describes with a two year old buckfast queen. Requeening yearly I have never seem the problem again.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
    Posts
    203

    Post

    The queen is this years queen and is the only queen I bought this year. I am going to replace her with a queen from one of my NUCs which have come from suvivor colonies.

    This queen was supposed to have resistance to TM, but as so often happens breeders are over selling them selves.

    Kieran
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

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