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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501

    Post

    I have been reading all the posts on the Dowda (or Finnish guy) Method. I am wondering if anyone has compared the 2rubes with the Dowda. Is there a significant difference? I would much prefer to just dump the sugar on top of the frames and brush in, rather than dust every frame. I want to do which ever works better though. I am going to put regular cane sugar in a blender and powder it - even though it is stated that the cornstarch will not hurt the bees. (Better safe than sorry!)
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501

    Post

    I just read that Janet (2rubes) doesn't powder during a honey flow. Why is that? I believe we are in the midst of a honey flow now. I guess I should wait until it is over??
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Guatemala
    Posts
    243

    Post

    You (or your customers) do not wish to have icing sugar in the honey cells. This is technically considered a contamination, even if it won´t hurt anyone.

    Besides, varroa populations should be kept down prior to the honey flow, during Spring build up, and then again after honey harvews, during the fall.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Covered Bridge Queen . . .

    Dumping, brushing, dusting every frame, and the world-famous "Blaster" method of applying powdered sugar are all forms of "dusting".

    Is one method better? Maybe, but whats MOST important, is that every bee gets cover w/ the dust. The method that does that best is the "best method" [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Most literature I read says powdered sugar CAN be used during honey flow. I think since the powder is applied ONLY over brood chamber that the risk of (man) getting any sugar, even a very small powdered "speck", into any uncapped cell of nectar/honey is very low. Will the bees carry/put some into an uncapped cell? Dont know.

    As w/ ANY treatment, regular monitoring of mite population IS REQUIRED.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Grass Valley, CA
    Posts
    249

    Post

    Hi, the reason I avoid using sugar during the honey flow is we sell to a health food store and have a commitment to our clients. We have observed the bees removing the sugar during a honey flow, so I don't believe they are storing the sugar at that time. I wouldn't let a honey flow stop you if you do have a severe infestation and do treat 3 or 4 times, 5 to 7 days apart to capture mites hiding in the capped brood. The sugar knocks the mite population down and that is going to save your hives. Do separate your super, which is the most effective. Once you get your mite's under control you can do all supers at once.
    Our hives were severely infested last year complete with deformed wings, and all hives made it with intensive multi-treatments of powdered sugar.
    Sincerely,
    Janet

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rosedale, IN
    Posts
    501

    Post

    Hi and thanks.

    Actually, I don't even have a super on. I just received three of the nucs two weeks ago and one of them just last Sat. A friend that also received a nuc from the same supplier told me he saw mites. I haven't done a count and probably don't even need to do it yet.
    "The greatest threat is our own staggering ignorance and cavalier treatment of the natural world to which we belong."

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