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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Eastbay, CA
    Posts
    203

    Post

    Hi,

    I found this article and found it very interesting.

    http://www.funpecrp.com.br/gmr/year2..._full_text.htm


    Kieran
    \"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree<br />And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made<br />nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee<br />and live alone in the bee-loud glade.\"<br />-- WB Yeats

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    Yes, intresting article!
    But in the abstract they say:

    "ABSTRACT. In Europe and North America honey bees cannot be kept without chemical treatments against Varroa destructor."

    I'm on my 5th year keeping bees in North America without chemical treatments of any kind. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Here' another article that was in Bee Culture:

    Quotes from an article in January 2006 Bee Culture
    In Research Reviewed by Steve Sheppard

    "Selection and possibilities within honeybees -
    Be careful what you select for."

    --------&gt;

    A team of Italian and German researchers selected
    lines of bees that tended to have either high or low
    mite populations and then investigated whether
    behavioral and physiological characteristics of bees
    from these lineages could be correlated to mite
    levels.

    The results reported by the researchers showed that:

    1) Mite resistance or tolerance as measured solely by
    mite population levels was not readily correlated with
    the various tested physiological and behavioral
    honeybee characteristics.

    2) There was no correlation between the tendency of
    the bees to remove pin-killed brood (hygienic
    behavior) and the mite infestation levels of the
    colony

    3) They was no correlation between the number of
    non-reproducing mites (SMR) and the level of mite
    infestation.

    4) There was no correlation between grooming and mite
    levels.

    5) There was no correlation between the percentage of
    damaged mites collected on sticky boards and the level
    of mite infestation.

    However, they did find that both brood area (number of
    brood cells) and the average honey crop harvested were
    higher in each year of the experiment in the so-called
    susceptible colonies compared to the resistant
    colonies!

    The authors caution the reader that hygienic behavior,
    non-reproduction of mites (SMR) and grooming may be
    traits that have limited value in a selection program
    designed to produce mite resistant honeybees.

    They further caution that it may be difficult to
    select for honeybees that produce both vigorous and
    productive colonies, yet have slow growing mite
    populations. Their rational for the latter statement
    is that mite population growth appears to be tied to
    brood levels. Thus, selection for low mite levels
    could actually select for bees that produce smaller
    amounts of brood.

    For example, by using mite infestation level (mite
    counts) as the only selective criterion, the
    researchers may have inadvertently selected for high
    and low brood producing lines of bees.

    Thus, their resistant bees actually may have been bees
    selected to produce less brood and to be less able to
    sustain mite population growth. Consequently, they
    also would have been less able to collect a surplus of
    honey.

    --------&gt;

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    &gt;For example, by using mite infestation level (mite counts) as the only selective criterion, the researchers may have inadvertently selected for high and low brood producing lines of bees.

    Just another reason why so-called scientific studies need to be looked at critically and not just accepted on faith.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    211

    Post

    George
    Selective criteria is the key when breading varroa resistant bees.Here in New Zealand there are several of us working on this from different approaches.A couple of years ago those of us selecting for resistant bees were invited to take a look at the work of Allois Wallner who runs 700 hives in Randegg Austria.His selection work was from 1989-1994.During this time he examined some 17000 damaged mites.The results of his work was published in 1994 titled VARROARESISTENT all in German.I took up the offer and have his permission to repoduce his work.The English text translation is 53 pages and best read with reference to the book photographs and charts.I will be placing a CD of his work into our New Zealand National Beekeepers Technical library shortly.
    BOB

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    &gt;Selective criteria is the key when breading varroa resistant bees.

    I agree completely, but as the above study suggests, one needs to be careful what you choose for selective criteria.

    &gt; will be placing a CD of his work into our New Zealand National Beekeepers Technical library shortly

    Good work. Will it become available on the internet in any way shape or form?
    Dulcius ex asperis

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