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  1. #221
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Post

    Bullseye Bill,

    The "platelets" you refer to are chitinous sclerites, different than cuticle. The chitin is covered by the waxy cuticle. The cuticle prevents dehydration.

    Even the "flexible" parts tend to be covered with chitin. Only the joints between the sclerites are not hardened, but they are covered with cuticle usually. In fact, when insects molt, the sclerotized tracheae (breathing tubes) and the scleriotized foregut and hindgut are shed along with the rest of the exoskeleton. In other words, even the first part of the digestive system inside the arthropods are covered with chitin.

    The "stuff" that protects mites is the same stuff that protects honey bees. The trick in applying a chemical is to apply enough to kill the mites without harming the bees; the mites develop some resistance, and the amount of OA that might have to be applied to kill Varroa might also be enough to kill or severely injure bees.

  2. #222
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Ah, more to think about. Thanks for the greater understanding of bug anatamy, er make up. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    I guess in the meantime we should just be happy that there is something that works, even if it is a stop gap measure.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  3. #223
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Thornton Colorado
    Posts
    2,003

    Post

    <Kieck>
    Species are not defined by the presence or absence of single characters...

    The difference between any two things, like a lug nut on a benz in Italy and an ameoba in a pond in Nebraska is but a single character.

    <Kieck>
    ... I think you're coming around to my way of thinking about evolution.

    Jon, [I hope you don't mind the jump to familiar] our views on the subject we discussed here always was very very similar. Enough to declare we are on the same side buddy.

    <tip of the hat>

    JohnF
    JohnF INTP

  4. #224
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    Bill,

    to what do you attribute the fact that you haven't had to treat this year?
    that's obviously the ultimate goal

    Dave

    [size="1"][ January 07, 2006, 09:46 AM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  5. #225
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bismarck ND
    Posts
    38

    Post

    What about OA mixed with Vegtable shortening?

    has anyone out there tried this grease method?

    Knoefler

  6. #226
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Casper, WY
    Posts
    526

    Post

    Hi Guys,

    Just image, if the downside of OA precipitates such a discussion as this, what would happen if you were to add grease to it!!! :&gt))

    Does all this off topic posting indicate that there isn't much downside to OA?

    Regards
    Dennis

    [size="1"][ January 20, 2006, 08:53 PM: Message edited by: B Wrangler ][/size]

  7. #227
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >Bill,

    to what do you attribute the fact that you haven't had to treat this year?
    that's obviously the ultimate goal

    Just saw this post

    I have only been doing a couple of things, well, actully NOT doing a few things.

    Not treating is the primary thing. Dedicating my efforts on bees that will survive with mites and making my splits from those are my future plans. It's a hard row to hoe.

    What has helped them survive? I can't say for sure. Year before last I helped them knock down mite loads with OA, but the thing that has been really noticeable is the lack of mites in the hives that are 100% PermaComb. Perhaps it is the smaller comb that is helping.

    I had 20 to 25 percent losses last winter. I may have less losses this year, but time will tell, it's too early to know for sure yet.

    There are others here on this board that have gone this way (non-treatment), and have what are virtually mite free, (or should I say mite tolerant?) yards, I hope to be one of them soon. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    [size="1"][ January 20, 2006, 09:11 PM: Message edited by: BULLSEYE BILL ][/size]
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

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