Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Drone Comb

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lyme, NH, USA
    Posts
    165

    Question

    Looking at the drone comb frame that I used last spring, I wondered if the bees had constructed smaller cells, so they could hold worker larvae and drones. I'd be intersted in your opinions!
    http://home.comcast.net/~smaddock1/h...honeycomb.html

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Obviously they did. Any of the cells that are not domed but are mostly flat, are worker cells.

    Bees will rework to get what they need at the time.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    Margot, Just measure the total distance of 10 cells and divide by 10. that would give you a fairly accurate measurement of 1 cell. then compare that measurement to a standard diameter for either a worker or drone cell.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Post

    Intresting 6 dimple patteren around the drone cells. Shows the bees we intent on making drone. I would cull the frame.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    I think you guys have missed the question. She put DRONE FOUNDATION in and the bees have built some worker brood in between the drone. A lot. If it's plastic I'd probably scrape it down just because it won't work well as a drone magnet if half the cells are workers.

    Measuring is irelevant when you can see the drones have domed caps and the workers have flat caps. You can see the percent of drone and workers at a glance. You can count them if you like, but they are interspersed too much for "across 10 cell" measurments to be of any use.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    Michael, You are right. Did not realize that worker and drone cells were interspersed.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lyme, NH, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    You're correct Michael, especially when you say that the bees will rework to get what they need. This plastic comb is sold as a method of mite control, since mites will only lay eggs in drone cells. If the bees adapt it for workers, then the comb doesn't serve the intended (advertised) purpose. I'm not sure whether I'll try to reuse it or not. If I have mixed cells, I'd probaly have to destroy worker cells, along with the drones, in order to kill the mites.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Marshall, VA USA
    Posts
    136

    Post

    Has anyone heard anything recently about this 'miracle' fungus and its progress to market? I tried to do a little research on my own and found that the company that originally manufactured it as a termite control (Bioblast) is out of business. I'm assuming that if it works as described that it'd be more than worth someone's time to begin manufacturing it again in a form useful to beekeepers. I'm wondering when we'll be able to buy it.

    Mike
    If you're not confused you just don't know what's going on.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    >This plastic comb is sold as a method of mite control, since mites will only lay eggs in drone cells.

    Not true, but the Varroa PREFER to lay eggs in the drone cells. They will happily lay them in worker cells if that's all there is available.

    >If the bees adapt it for workers, then the comb doesn't serve the intended (advertised) purpose.

    True, because it won't attract anymore mites than the worker brood. The idea is to draw them away from the worker brood.

    >I'm not sure whether I'll try to reuse it or not. If I have mixed cells, I'd probaly have to destroy worker cells, along with the drones, in order to kill the mites.

    True, but they may do better next time if you scrape it down.

    >Has anyone heard anything recently about this 'miracle' fungus and its progress to market?

    Do a search and you'll find quite a bit of discussion on it and the recent setbacks.

    > I tried to do a little research on my own and found that the company that originally manufactured it as a termite control (Bioblast) is out of business.

    That's where I ended up also.

    >I'm assuming that if it works as described that it'd be more than worth someone's time to begin manufacturing it again in a form useful to beekeepers. I'm wondering when we'll be able to buy it.

    The question is probably IF we'll be able to buy it AND then maybe when.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Try searching on Metarhizium anisopliae for info on the fungus.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,226

    Post

    >.~ GO STEELERS!!!


    Ha ha ha ha
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    >.~ GO STEELERS!!!


    Ha ha ha ha

    I'm with you Ian, the Pats won me a night out!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    Mike, there are three separate companies preparing to market the miracle fungus you mentioned. The best estimate at this time is 2 years untill it hits the market.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Marshall, VA USA
    Posts
    136

    Post

    Thanks for the info Morris. I've asked several of the Master Beekeepers in my area and they all say it looks very promising. Guess time will tell. I couldn't get any info from the folks I spoke to as to why the company culturing the fungus for termite control went under. From what I'm able to learn about it, it looks like it's also effective against SHB which we are just starting to see around my way.

    Mike
    If you're not confused you just don't know what's going on.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads