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  1. #1

    Question

    At work, some people have been telling me of some bee stories in the press. One relates to recent mite problems. I think that I know about varoa, but is there some other concern for bee pests? Is it something to do with osama/obama?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Recently (in the last decade or so) there have Tracheal Mites, Varroa Mites and Small Hive Beetles.

    Also, apparently some of the terrorist organizations are involved in the middle east honey business.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Frequently local reporters stumble upon a
    beekeeper, and find him or her an irresistible
    "human interest" story.

    The beekeeper will always mention the decline
    of beekeeping due to the pests and diseases,
    so it is reported as if it were a recent thing,
    rather than a problem over a decade old.

    The local papers around here have done 4 or 5
    stories on "me", and they were all pretty much
    the same, except for one fellow, who decided
    to contrast the high-tech (and at the time, hush-hush) 21st-Century techno work at the lab,
    surrounded by trappings of the 19th, if not the
    18th Century. We had to move a hive over to the
    dish farm so he could set up the shot he wanted
    of "High Tech/Low Tech" - the bucolic beekeeper,
    working his hive in the peace and quiet of the
    countryside while only feet away, gigs of data
    were streaming up to satellites, blah, blah, blah.

    At least he was original. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    If you think about it, bees would make excellent
    dispersal tools for all sorts of nasty bio-weapons
    targeted at crops, but I doubt that terrorists
    would go to all the trouble of using bees when
    small planes could carry much more payload, and
    be easier to transport, deal with, and hide in
    a crowd of other small planes at the various
    regional airports where they tend to congregate.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    jfischer, Bees are also a great way to disperse biocontrol organisms like Metarhizium anisopliae, for the control of varroa. The bees will apparently spread this fungus from hive to hive as they naturally drift.

    Speaking of this fungus, do you know if Metarhizium anisoplia strain designation ESC1 is the same as M. anisopliae strain # 5630?

    Also, since the temperature growing parameters for this wonderfull fungus are so tight (80 F. +or- 1 F)how is it that they can do so well in the hive where the normal fluctuations within the hive body are greater than 1 F, and I would imagine that a relatively small portion of the hive is 80 F.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    Maybe this temperature requirement is related to some sucesses and some failures.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    Michael, you are correct about partial positive growth. Even in an incubator where temps are uneven, there is heavy growth in the 80 degree F. area, and little or no growth in areas just a little warmer or cooler. So the question remains, how does it prosper in a hive?

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