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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    hennep: Thanks for the good info. Occasionally in my hives I've noticed a single cell capped with a web (just one cell and no other apparent damage). I wonder if this could be a pseudo-scorpion nest? Pseudo-scorpions look bigger than varroa so must be visible to the naked eye? I'll watch more closely in future hive inspections.
    Triangle Bees

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    943

    Post

    Take a look under the web. I have seen individual cells covered with a web that upon further inspection contained a very small wax moth larva. Not sure how old they are, but they probably just haven't gotten big enough to do much damage -- YET!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,127

    Post

    Usually if the webs are just under the cell cappings its Braula coeca larvae. Wax moth larva usually go right for the midrib.

    http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/pest&disease/sl46.html

    http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/pest&disease/sl44.html

    http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/pest&disease/sl45.html
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Post

    The web is very thin, fairly dense and "caps" a single cell. Seems to be a different kind of web - not like wax moth. I havn't seen any tunnels or other evidence and have never seen Braula coeca on the bees. Maybe a really small spider?
    Triangle Bees

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    943

    Post

    That pretty well describes what I saw on empty comb that was stored in my garage. It was not a wax moth coccoon, but a very thin layer of web over just one cell with webbing or maybe a coccoon at the bottom of the cell. There were maybe 4 or 5 of these scattered across one deep brood comb. I'll bet if you watch it closely, within a few days you'll see tunnelling starting at the bottom of that cell into adjoining cells. When I saw that, I dug out what I assumed to be a very young wax moth larva maybe 1/4" long and very thin. I didn't think about it at the time, but I wonder now if it might not have been a SHB larva. I saw no adults anywhere. I should have looked at it under magnification. Anyway, I cycled all my stored brood comb through the freezer for 24 hours.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,127

    Post

    SHB larvae are "spikey".
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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