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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    I would love to hear what people are using in place of the conventional chemicals. This is my first year and so far my plan is this:

    For Varroa:
    1. screened bottem boards
    2. drone comb
    3. sugar sprinkle after the brood is gone (I haven't done this yet)

    For Tracheal Mites:
    1. Grease Patty

    For AFB:
    nothing

    For Nosema:
    nothing

    Does that seem unrealistic? And does anyone have a link for more info on FGMO? And how does the grease patty compare with the essential oils?
    Thanks.
    Louise

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,138

    Post

    >I would love to hear what people are using in place of the conventional chemicals.

    I'm using screened bottom boards, small cell and fogging with FGMO. After I get them all regressed I will phase out the FGMO and see how that goes.

    >For Tracheal Mites:

    FGMO fog and small cell.

    >For AFB:
    nothing

    >For Nosema:
    nothing

    >Does that seem unrealistic?

    If you monitor the mites so you know if it's working you can make adjustments. I do think the drone method is a lot of work for the bees and the beekeeper, but I think it will work to kill the varroa too.

    >And does anyone have a link for more info on FGMO?
    http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/000041.html http://www.beesource.com/ubb/Forum11/HTML/000099.html http://www.beesource.com/pov/rodrigu...2001report.htm

    >And how does the grease patty compare with the essential oils?

    Most people put essential oils in their grease patties. I'm not sure how much they help, but I have used them in the past.

    They say the essential oils suppress the reproduction of the mites and boost the immune system of the bees.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Post

    Thank you Michael. I can't believe that I didn't see the entire section on FGMO!
    I went to a Honey Bee Pest & Disease workshop this spring and FGMO didn't even make it to the outline. I remember it being mentioned by a participant, but it was dismissed pretty quickly. I'm glad to have this source.
    Louise

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    >I went to a Honey Bee Pest & Disease workshop this spring and FGMO didn't even make it to the outline. I remember it being mentioned by a participant, but it was dismissed pretty quickly.

    The same thing happened at our meeting in Emporia last spring.

    Emporia Educated

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,303

    Post

    You might want to read this before deciding what course of action to take.I hear George has an opinion or two! http://www.beekeeper.org/sep2000.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    One of the first things I did when I started beekeeping was to print off all of Georges Pink Pages and made a book out of it. For quick reference I use the old standards, ABC-XYZ, and Hive and Honeybee, but for a monthly review I re-read my Pink Pages. You have to figure the months differences for your area, but the information is priceless.

    Tickeled Pink

    [This message has been edited by BULLSEYE BILL (edited August 21, 2003).]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    156

    Smile

    Yah, I've just started reading those pink pages! Printing them out is a great idea. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Post

    Loggermike,
    Thank-you for the post. Very informative.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    >I would love to hear what people are using in place of the conventional chemicals.

    I'm using screened bottom boards, small cell and fogging with FGMO. After I get them all regressed I will phase out the FGMO and see how that goes.

    For Tracheal Mites:

    FGMO fog and small cell.

    For AFB:
    nothing

    For Nosema:
    nothing

    I don't use grease pattys as they seem to encourage the Small Hive Beetles to come into the hives.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    I use screened bottom boards and a Honey-B-Healthy equivalent that I mix for Spring and Fall feedings. I've not seen any mites todate, but I'm not certain it has anything to do with my beekeeping methods, or just plain luck with my bees. So far, so good.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,138

    Post

    >I use screened bottom boards and a Honey-B-Healthy equivalent that I mix for Spring and Fall feedings. I've not seen any mites todate, but I'm not certain it has anything to do with my beekeeping methods, or just plain luck with my bees. So far, so good

    Are you doing a drop test of some kind? A sticky board or something with oil on it under the SBB? If you aren't seeing any drop that's a good thing. If you are just looking on the bees and not seeing them, that's hard to say if you do have them and aren't seeing them or if you don't have any. They are very difficult to spot if you haven't seen them before.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    The only drop tests I have done were to count the natural mite drop rates, and I've done lots of drone cell scratching, and have never seen a mite up to now. I know that the older beekeeper friend who I get some of my bees from has had mites in some of his hives in the past. I'm wondering if something that the bees forage on locally has natural miticidal properties, but really have no idea.

    [This message has been edited by dragonfly (edited August 25, 2003).]

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,138

    Post

    >The only drop tests I have done were to count the natural mite drop rates

    That will do to see if you have an infestation.

    >and I've done lots of drone cell scratching

    This is also useful.

    >and have never seen a mite up to now. I know that the older beekeeper friend who I get some of my bees from has had mites in some of his hives in the past. I'm wondering if something that the bees forage on locally has natural miticidal properties, but really have no idea.

    Could be luck. Could be the HBH. I would always keep monitoring.

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