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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    821

    Post

    Where does Varroa mites comes from?

    The Varroa is a natural parasite living on the East Indian bee Aspis cerana for millions of years.
    Scientists found the Varroa first time in 1904.

    The honeybee Apis mellifera never had any contact with this parasite before.

    In 1975 Scientists form a German University and Beekeeping Institute ordered queens form the east for tests and crossbreeding. This idiots didnÂ’t inspect the new queens and bees and so arrived the Varroa mite in Europe. In 1977 we found the first Varroa mites in colonies close to this institute.
    If thinks like this will be happen with a private person, they would bring him in jail till the end of his live.
    The rest was easyÂ… When I see all the beekeeper on this forum asking for nucs and queens instead breeding there own. It is not better in the rest of the world.

    Transporting bees from one continent to other will also bring the disease with. Same thing with the small hive beetle from Africa to the US.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i do get worried about what might be in a package besides bees!i i'm gonna try to stay local.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

    Post

    Varroa can truly be a nasty problem. I set up 3 new hives exacty 15 days ago and yesterday I already counted 3, 12 and 10 varroa mites on the tray below the SBB of each hive respectively. Since there has been no time for any bees in either of the 3 hives to emerge, hence no time for varroa mites to emerge either, these are all foretically acquired (= brought in from other hives). My nearest beekeeping neighbohrs lost all their hives this winter (2 doz each or so), so these must come from far away or from feral stock around here.

    Jorge

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    821

    Post

    Jorge thatÂ’s thru, when you split your colony put one or two Oxamite strip cross the frames to make sure they have a good clean start. The bees gnaw the strips coming in contact with the substances and all the mites outside the cells getting killed. I find out the strips reducing a lot the reification from neighbor beekeepers. the strips can stay at least 5 weeks in the hive and all mites must come out of the cells one day. There are no chemicals involved because all substances are natural and mites canÂ’t get resistance. We got the Oxamite from a US company 3 week ago because here we have a waiting list for almost a month. http://www.members.shaw.ca/orioleln
    I controlled yesterday the sticky board and mites are falling.


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