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Thread: Wax Moths

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lynnville, Ia, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    Wax moths are always present to some degree. The amount varies a lot from year to year. I have even seen moths walk in the hive entrance. There seems to be a period right after sundown when the guard bees relax. I have watched moths go in unchallenged. This is also an excellent time to put a new queen in a split. Just run them in the entrance. they are almost always excepted.

    Srong colonies will always control moths in the brood boxes in our area. Empty honey supers are another problem, especially if they have pollen in them. Putting supers on over the inner cover has worked for us but it's inconvienient if you need to feed or give meds. We now keep a yard with about ten colonies in it where we stack the empty supers. There are usually enough bees going into the stacks to control moths but we still have a problem with the frames that have pollen in them.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    michael,i've noticed in another forum you said some of your hives are6-7 feet tall,i think you have too much space that the bees are not actively using,thus the moths are able to get established in areas of low activity.as far as storing empty comb,i've found that if you leave the boxes on their side or stagger them when stacking,the moths don't like being exposed to the air and light and tend to leave them alone more.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,570

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    I have had hives that were making 200 pounds of honey and they get that tall. I haven't had a lot of moths when they are on the hives, but sometimes I get a few. They were really bad this year in the supers after I extracted them. I think they do better with the moths when they are on the hives.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    Where do the wax moths spend the winter? I assume as an egg. Therefore freezing the combs may kill the larva but must leave eggs intact. After all, those same combs get frozen outside in this area. It follows that I could stack a bunch of supers that are clean and airtight and have just one egg hatch ruin thingss. True?

    Dickm

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,570

    Post

    >Where do the wax moths spend the winter?
    I assume the same place flys do, under shingles in roofs of heated houses, buried somewhere where they don't quite freeze. I've see lots of flys and some moths when tearing off roofs in the winter.

    >I assume as an egg. Therefore freezing the combs may kill the larva but must leave eggs intact.

    I don't know about that. It would be interesting to know for sure.

    >After all, those same combs get frozen outside in this area. It follows that I could stack a bunch of supers that are clean and airtight and have just one egg hatch ruin thingss. True?

    I don't know.

    Mine got bad before it froze.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,499

    Post

    Up here in Canada it gets very cold during the winter months. I very seldom have a wax moth problem becasue of this very fact. The moth, larvea and eggs all perish when it freezes. Although the eggs need more extended fridgid temperatures than the moth and larvae do.

    Ian

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,570

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    It's good to know the cold kills the eggs. I suspected but wasn't certain of that.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    If the cold kills everything ... where do the new moths come from in the spring?

    Dickm

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,570

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    As I said, when I've torn off roofs in the winter I've found live moths and flys under the shingles. They catch the heat from the house to keep from totally freezing. I would imagine there must be other places as well. I know some survive in the hives from the heat from the cluster. I've seen them in the pile of combs at the bottom of the hive in a tree heated by the bees. Not enough to be real active but enough that they don't totatly freeze. The eggs could be in places that get cold, but not that cold.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,499

    Post

    I read somewhere a while ago that placing a single sheet of newprint in between every, or everyother honey super in storage would repell the moths. They claimed the moths disliked the smell of the ink on the paper.
    Has anyone else hear of this? Does it really work?

    >If the cold kills everything ... where do the new moths come from in the spring?

    Because I still get a mild infestation later in the year, I assume some wax moths or eggs must overwinter sucessfully. Perhaps in places where they are somewhat sheilded from the extreem temperatures. My supers in storage recieve the extreem cold day after day temperatures.

    Ian

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Question

    maybe waxmoths die off completely in northern climates,and migrate north as the weather gets warmer,monarchs fly from mexico.

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