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Thread: Wax Moths

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    I have had, this year, the worse time ever with wax moths. They pretty much devestated all of my drawn comb. I think in part this was because the wax moths were already in the supers when I pulled them (but not in that large of numbers) and for the first (and last) time I tried leaving the supers wet and was going to give them to the bees in the spring to clean up. This did not work. The only reason I tried it was I was regressing and was afraid the bees would move back up into the comb and abandon the queen.

    In talking with other beekeepers I have had the following observations shared with me.

    This one is in the south. He had observed wax moths at night crawl down the side of the hive and sneak over the gaurd bees heads when the bottom board was set at 3/4". He is now running his reversable bottom boards at 3/8" instead.

    This one is from Canada. It's that the bees on a chilly night, even in summer, will cluster and when the bees do this he has observed wax moths sneaking in the top entrance and laying in the supers because the bees are down in the brood area.

    Has anyone else observed sililar things? These would make me wonder about both having such a tall entrance at the bottom board and if I even want a top entrance in the summer.

    Of course some if this may be climate issues. If it never gets cold enough to cluster maybe the moths won't get in much on a hot summer night in the south.

    I would appreciate hearing any other observations people have on wax moths and how they get in the hive and how to prevent them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
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    Post

    I actually found one laying little black eggs under the top cover of one of my hives last year. I don't think you'll keep them out, the important thing is to keep the hives strong enough to control them.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  3. #3
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    I agree a strong hive is best, but there is no point inviting them in either.

    I think the ones under the cover will hatch and get into the hive. Of course, if it's storng they will eventually kill it, but I've seen some live wax worms in strong hives. They usually can't get out of the midrib or they get killed, but I've seen them there. Also you bring in some supers and then they hatch and there's no bees to run them out.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
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    806

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    Hi Michael,

    I have had problems with the moths as well this winter. I store wet supers in my unheated garage and it usually gets cold enough, early enough to kill them off.

    Not so this year. The temps in the garage have generally be above freezing. It will slow the moths down but not stop them.

    Dennis

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
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    261

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    I was reading an article in the latest ABJ where it is suggested that combs can be safely stored "in hive" over winter and spring, instead of adding them as needed in the Spring and summer. They would simply be stacked on the after extraction over an inner cover. This is suggested as a form of mold prevention, but it seems of course that, unless the hive is really strong, it might invite moths in.
    Has anybody tried this?

    Jorge

  6. #6
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    Aug 2002
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    I have not, but it doesn't sound like too bad of an idea. I would think if it's warm enough for the moths to do anything, it's warm enough for the bees to defend it. Then again it may be worse because it will stay warm from the escaping heat of the cluster and may keep the moths alive all winter. Sounds like we need an experiment.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
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    2,837

    Question

    When you store your supers/bodies off the hive, don't you use Para-Moth?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    >don't you use para moth...

    Not unless I'm desperate. I've used Certan with fair results. I've used nothing, with dry supers (the bees cleaned them off) with fair results. This is the first year I left the supers wet, because I was afraid to let them clean them while I was regressing. I thought they might try to move in and abondon the queen.

    I don't like the smell nor do I like the toxicity of para moth.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
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    I think that if you left the combs on the hive, it might keep the moths under control in a few ways. First, the bees are clustering around the honey which should be in the lower supers which would leave the upper supers to get cold enough to kill the moths. Then when it gets warmer, the bees should do the rest. This is just my theory though.

  10. #10
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    Aug 2002
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    I think there's enough heat from the bees to keep it from freezing in the top supers. At least most of the time.

  11. #11

    Big Grin

    hello
    I had no problems with wax moths since I started to useing eucalypus oils once a month.
    I use 1 teaspoon to a qt. of honey to feed as a top feed.
    5 yrs never seem to have that problem=but now it helps to have a strong hive too
    Don

  12. #12
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    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    You feed the eucalyptus oil while there are supers on the hive? DoesnÂ’t it taint the honey?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
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    571

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    i've found that alot of wax moths are hanging out between my screened bottom board and the regular reversd botom board,they lay on the trays where wax scales fall,every so often i pull it out and stick all the cocoons and grubs in my lit smoker,they fire up pretty good.i've also tried rubbing cedar wod oil on the bottom trays but can't say for sure if it did any good.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marion, North Carolina
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    423

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    If you made a hive body out of cedar, do you think the wax moths would avoid the hive?

    I know it would be expensive, but so is replacing a hive. Do you think the bees would mind the smell of cedar?

    Thesurveyor

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Just plain western cedar and aromatic cedar are two different things. The closets are the aromatic cedar. I've never tried a cedar hive, but have thought about it. Cost, is of course the first problem. As to acceptance, I've heard of bees in cedar trees, so I would think they wouldn't mind, but I don't really know. After the bees propolize the whole insides there may not be that much of the smell left.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Sapulpa,OK USA
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    174

    Post

    I'm not an expert as I have not been keeping bees long, but I left my suppers on top of my hives. I have not had a problem. We have had cold and worm day through this winter. The Hive was strong going into winter.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
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    571

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    eastern red cedar(juniperus virginiana) is what grows aroung here and it's fairly potent wood and rot resistant,i've think the moths would be less inclined to really tunnel into them. i've also wondered about sassafras.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Cibolo, Texas
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    20

    Post

    Wouldn't the cedar smell taint the honey? I know clothes stored in a cedar chest have a faint smell for a while.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    I took in my winter killed hives this week. I have 3 categories of stuff to store. 1 Drawn comb with little in it, but something. (A little capped honey or even open honey or a trifle of pollen). 2. Frames with considerable honey. 3 Frames with considerable pollen. I bought the Para-moth stuff from Mann Lake and read the label. It seems that I can use it on nothing I have without taking a chance of poisoning the new bees when they clean this up. Mike, Would Cretan work on open frames that you know the bees will be into?

    Dickm

  20. #20
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    Yes I think certan will work on anything. It offers no threat to bees or humans. I get it from www.beeworks.com ( try http://www.beeworks.com/uspage5.asp at the bottom of the page) and have not seen it for sale anywhere else. He doesn't have it labled in the catalog as "Certan", though it is, but it says "wax moth control" and described as "The only biological larvaecide available for the control of Wax Moth in comb, both in store and the hive."

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