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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Question

    Does anyone know what the incidence of European foulbrood is here in the US?
    Thanks,
    Denise

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    I would speculate that has to do with where you are located. Around here it is a very common spring occurrence if you move bees to pollination particularly blueberries.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    Wineman,
    I am in KY. I have a suspected case. I will send some specimens to the entomologist at University of KY on Tuesday. I did the rope test and it appears negative for AFB. In the meantime I assume I should treat with Terramycin?
    Thanks,
    Denise

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    Terrimycin seems to be the common treatment here in the states, but Streptomycin is more effective. Most likely it will go away later in the summer on it's own.

    I'd say EFB is much more common than AFB.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    So, Michael, are you saying I don't necessarily have to treat it? I'd rather not as, even though there are only about 5 frames of bees they are just starting to bring in nectar to store in the honey supers. I'm missing out on the flow bad enough already.
    By the way, I saw two swarm cells in this hive. Would they be preparing to swarm to get away from the EFB conditions? If so , than maybe I SHOULD treat.
    Denise

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Generally speaking I don't do anything for EFB. It typically takes care of itself once the bees get on a honeyflow and are out of the stress of pollination. It never presents any real long term problems by itself. That scenario could be different if you have a heavy mite load, severe chalkbrood or the concern of breaking down with AFB.

    I might treat with TM if it was a weak colony and I REALLY wanted to save it. Otherwise I would most likely let it take care of itself or perish. If you treat it as a means to save the bees in the short term, you may want to consider requeening down the road to something that doesnt seem so EFB susceptible.

    This might be a small, weak colony which ended up with EFB due to those stresses. However, one other thing to keep in mind......when varroa is present at high levels and the viruses spread, those conditions can sometimes resembles EFB.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    I guess I didn't mention this particular hive is a package of Carns I hived April 13th. They still only have 4-5 frames of bees. I hate to have to medicate them, but I didn't spend 45 bucks to let them fend for themselves. So I'll medicate them tomorrow.
    Thanks everyone for the advice.
    Denise

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    Some of the essential oil treatments such as Honey Bee Healthy or wintergreen and some others are know to have some anti microbial properties and to boost the immune system of the bees. Some feeding of syrup even without these essential oils can relieve some of the stress in a hive and clear up EFB. I'd probably try some essential oil and syrup treatment before I tried the Terramycin. I'd also look and see if you can find Streptamycin instead.

    Let us know how it works out.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    There are two other treatments for EFB that work. One is to eliminate the queen, put in a queen in a cage but don't release her for a couple of weeks. This gives the brood rearing a break and often makes it go away. If you go 28 days without brood and there is no where for the EFB to live and you will completly eliminate it. It does not leave spores like AFB. Another is to simply requeen. This often fixes it and I'm not sure why except that it causes a small break in brood rearing and a young queen is a stress reliever.

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