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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    lynnwood, WA, USA
    Posts
    19

    Sad

    My brother and I disected a few of the bees that were crawling in fromt on my hives. In the abdomens of two of these bees, we found 1.5mm long maggots (5 in the first bee, 3 in the second) they looked liked bee maggots only much smaller. We looked inside a few healthy bees, and didnt find anything. What kind of maggots are these? where do they come from? is it a serious problem? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Hi

    Want you to know I posted this as a topic on BEE-L to see what others thought about it and what you are seeing.

    I myself think they might be "Flagellates" but I cannot tell without looking at samples.

    This response came back from Dave on BEE-L:
    He can tell if they are flagellates by looking for whips or tails.

    The whips are several times longer then the body. If he can't find whips
    then it might be something else. Just a thought.

    Hope this helps some. Can you give more specific description if not and I will post again, especially if you are still seeing, as I too would like to find out what you got there.

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    If they're flagellates I'd expect them to be microscopic, single-celled, with a whip or 'flagellum' to drive them through the water of fluid that they live in. The whip is only visible in dead specimens; in life all you see is a disturbed region to the rear as the beast drives itself forward. This doesn't sound much like what you're talking about.

    I'm wondering about parasitic wasps. In the UK we have a thing called the 'velvet ant', it's actually a mutilid wasp, which parasitise bee or ant larvae. It's larvae would look like maggots. The old books list it as a pest of bees, but I think it's probably very minor, at least in the UK. Our species seem to go mainly for ants or bumblebees. I can't think of a wasp which parasitises adult insects without paralysing them first though, and I don't know whether you have mutilids in your area. Just a thought.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

    [This message has been edited by Robert Brenchley (edited July 28, 2002).]

    [This message has been edited by Robert Brenchley (edited July 28, 2002).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Hi

    Here is another possible solution for what you are seeing written on BEE-L back to me that I now post for you:

    Dave Cushman from UK wrote:
    Apymyiasis

    I did not know this myself until a couple of months ago...

    The info below is clipped from a private post.
    <<
    A "myiasis" is the term used for parasitic larvae infesting animals
    or
    people. When these fly larvae affect bees, it is termed
    "apimyiasis".
    There are a variety of flies that could infest bees:

    What you describe could be from the family Sarcophagidae (flesh
    flies).
    These are similar to blowflies but are grey with black thoracic
    stripes. These flies parasitise bees on flowers or may swoop down on
    bees at the hive entrance (as you mentioned), depositing newly
    hatched
    larvae in a bee's back every 6 to 10 seconds. The larva enters the
    bee
    via the spiracles, where it lives in the thorax until it is about 2
    mm
    in length. The bee then dies and the larva moves to the abdomen
    (possibly the swollen white abdomens you observed on your bees). The
    larva then grows to approx. 8 mm long then leaves to pupate in the
    ground (often in front of the hive), emerging as an adult in 6 to 8
    weeks.

    The book "Honey bee pests, predators and diseases" by Roger Morse and
    Kim Flottum is a fantastic resource with regard to bee disease etc.
    In
    case you are interested, this is the book I got all this info from
    >>


    Best Regards & 73s... Dave Cushman, G8MZY
    Beekeeping & Bee Breeding Website... http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman

    Hopes this helps you some.

    Sincerely,

    Dee A. Lusby

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,313

    Post

    We have the "velvet ants" here in the states as well. I've seen them here in Nebraska and when I was living there, in Illinois.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Casper, Wy, USA
    Posts
    804

    Post

    Hello,

    Some nematods have been reported in the past as minor parasites in honeybees. See page 115 in "Honey Bee Pests, Predators and Disease" by Roger Morse and Kim Flottum.

    No economic damage has been recorded though.

    Dennis

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