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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Califon, NJ, USA
    Posts
    14

    Sad

    I 'm an old/new beekeeper. In 1968, I was at that time living in France, when my uncle passed away, I had, with my aunt, to take care to my uncle's bees (3 Boxes, 2 Skeps w/ supper, and 2 Dadant hives). I did my best for 4-5 years and for some reasons, I had to leave them.
    I moved to the US / NJ five years ago. Last March, I met one of my wife's colleagues who has 6 hives (Langstroth of course). I lent him some antique French books I had on apiculture and bought new ones (especially about bee diseases). I asked him where and how he bought his material and bees … and guess what? – I am back to bees and now have a nice hive in our backyard.
    I bought a 2 story-hive and a 5 frames nuc at a local bee supplier. On May 6th, my son (6 1/2 years) and I installed the colony from the cardboard nuc to the 10 frames hive (3 w/brood + 2 w/honey from the nuc + 5 frames w/wax foundation). We fed the colony with a 1:1 syrup + Fumidil-B. For almost two weeks, unfortunately, we could see dead larva with chalk brood at the entrance of the hive. So last Sunday, we investigated the hive. Everything seemed to be OK, the queen was there, we saw some larva, nice and white, the number of bees was greater than when we installed them and a lot were young. There were 6 frames of brood, some empty cells. I think it is due to the larva that died from chalk brood. The 4 other frames were partially built with nectar and honey in two of them, so we decided to put the next story of 10 frames of foundation on the first one with a Miller feeder one top of them.
    Now that I am done setting the context, my question is “What can I do to stop the chalk brood?” “ Should I requeen now or wait until July?”
    Does anybody know what causes the chalk brood? Is it stress or weather or some thing else???

    Thank you for your help.



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    Regards

    Jean-Claude@bonnejournee.net

    Califon,NJ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    The real question is, how much chalkbrood are we talking about? Is it a few larvae, in wghich case you've probably got nothing to worry about, or is it hundreds or thousands? I'm told - perhaps somebody from your side of the Atlantic can confirm this - that chalkbrood has become a lot commoner over there since the introduction of prophylactic treatment with TM, so if you're using it routinely I suggest you stop unless you have an actual outbreak of foulbrood. The likely reason for this is that antibiotics kill beneficial bacteria as well as the nasties, allowing fungi like the mould which causes chalkbrood to flourish; there's a fungus disease of the bowel we can get as a result of overindulgence in antibiotics. If that fails and you still have a serious infection, you probably need to requeen from another strain, as some strains are particularly susceptible. If the situation's desparate, you could treat with thymol if it's available over there, but it's seriously poisonous, and wouldn't really be justified unless you had massive amounts of chalkbrood.

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    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Califon, NJ, USA
    Posts
    14

    Exclamation

    Thank you Robert for your quick answer.
    So far I just can only see no more than a thousand larvae per day, so I will hold on this.
    Since I have had my bees I didn't use TM. The stain I have is Italian, I would rather have Apis Mellifera Mellifera like you have in Europe But I can't find them here in the US, I will think about requeening with CarniolanÂ…


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    Regards

    Jean-Claude@bonnejournee.net

    Califon,NJ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    If you mean that you're losing a thousand larvae a day that would devastate the hive in short order. If it's really that bad treat with thymol or another fungicidal essential oil if you can get it. Amm was introduced to the States long before Italians, so the genes are all there in the mix. As far as I know they were taken from along the Atlantic seaboard, more of less, so they probably wouldn't have been so well adapted to a continental climate. Carniolans are continental, so if you're area isn't too hot in summer, they might do well.

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    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    I had two hives in one yard last year develop chaulk brood. I had read that cool / damp conditions help promote the fungus that is the cause of Chalk Brood.
    I moved both of these hives from this yard, which was too close to a cold mountain stream, and put them in a field in direct sun for a few weeks.
    The Chaulk Brood cleared up and has not returned.
    The weather this spring being cold and damp, may be part of the problem.
    Good luck,
    Scott

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Califon, NJ, USA
    Posts
    14

    Smile

    Thanks for the tips. I moved my hive to a sunnier location two weeks ago and I can see the improvement already. Still some larvae but nothing compared to what it used to be.
    Thanks again


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    Regards

    Jean-Claude@bonnejournee.net

    Califon,NJ

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