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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    To Aspera----I can seal 20 hives in just a few seconds for moving. My inner covers have an opening in the rim with a turnbuckle ? type closure. The hives are joined together with pieces of strapping and screws. The bottoms are affixed to the hive box the same way. All my bottom boards are the same length as the hive box and all have been built up an extra inch and have screenboards. THERE IS A SCREW IN THE END OF THE SCREENBOARD AND ONE ABOVE IT IN THE HIVE BOX. a PIECE OF WIRE IS ATTACHED TO THE SCREW IN THE SCREENBOARD. When I want to move hives, I wait till the bees are in for the night and walk along them grabbing the wire and pulling the screenboard up and securing it to the screw on the hivebox. At the same time (or before this)I close the upper entrance with a push. Also, all my hives have screening on the hole in the inner cover. Leave the outer cover off while moving and the bees get air from under the screenboard and the hole in the inner cover. Opening them is a snap also, just unwire the screenboard and drop it down. IT takes mere seconds to close and open them for moving. If any bees persist on lingering around the front of the hive, just carry a spritzer bottle of water with you and two or three spritzes and they'll go in. Good luck
    sterlingc

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    heat and road condition are the prime concerns and of course dtwilliamson has given no clue as to how exactly large these 20 + hives might be...

    If large I would use a dolley and ramp and anything beyond 2 deeps is going to feel large very quickly. If you know heat is going to be a factor use screened tops. nail down all lids, use hive staples on bottoms. Wood bottom boards will slide fairly easy on a metal pickup bed decks, not so easy on wood (I use a piece of plywood for this purpose). securing the load down with either ratchet straps or learn to use a beekeeper/hayhaulers knot (rope and s hooks required). even if you use ratchet straps run an X pattern over the very back of the load with rope to prevent backward tipping when you accelerate. If load protrudes much above the cab and/or if the truck does not have a headache rack run the same X rope pattern on the front of the load to prevent forward tipping when braking.

    as someone mentioned planning pays and tecumseh just adds be careful, be safe...

    good luck...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Post

    >>Didnt I show you my Hillbilly hive loader when you were here,

    yeah, I might end up using something like that. I will be working alone so anything I do will have to be done in a way that one person can handle everything.

    Thanks for all the suggestions.

    Joel,

    >>We use a 4 wheeler and run singles so haul 4 on at at a time.

    As in an ATV or a pallet loader? I'm confused as to what you mean?

    Aspera,

    We moved hives in a car once..... A complete disaster. Just make sure they can't move.... or somehow fall over... You don't want to still be finding fossilized bees 2 years later in every crevice of your car.

    I'll get a trailer at some point but my $$ has been going to buying other beekeeping equip. I figure I can make due for a year or two with my pickup. All suggestions and comments were certainly appreciated... Now I just need to do weight training..... [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dan
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Post

    Yeah, my car has some rather interesting debris in it now. On the bright side, I'm sure it will stir up may memories when I finally get around to excavating it [img]smile.gif[/img] Busybguy, could you post a pic? I think I understand you, but sometimes thinkin' gets me into trouble.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    Sorry, I don,t have access to a digital camera. When I get new inner covers, the first thing I do is lay them on the workbench and in the middle I draw two lines about two inches apartand both at the same angle(the angle doesn,t matter as long as they are the same. Look at the angle on the computor keys of the / ) Cut along each line in to the depth of the cover. Then carefully pry this piece off without splitting it. Then clean the surface of the cover with a knife, put the piece back in place and nail it in place with one nail deadcenter. This nail now acts as a hinge and you can open and close the opening with a touch of the finger.
    sterlingc

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    Whoops--I should have said-in the middle of the rim I draw two lines. Sorry
    sterlingc

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Key Largo, Fl
    Posts
    47

    Post

    I think busybguy is describing the same type openings (only larger) used on Snellgrove boards

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Post

    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Rochester, Washington, USA
    Posts
    973

    Post

    I usually move 2 hives at a time and use a garden cart, strap the hives to the cart and the cart to the pick-up bed (yes I use ramps to get the cart into the bed) the cart I use can haul 3 at a time. I strap it Long ways across the bed,
    1-1 the (1) being the bed and the (-)being the cart. The frames run the opposite direction.
    \"ONLY WHEN THE LAST RIVER HAS BEEN DRIED UP<br />THE LAST TREE BEEN CUT DOWN<br />THE LAST WILD FISH CAUGHT<br />WILL MAN REALIZE YOU CAN\'T EAT MONEY\"<br />GHANDI (?)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    Michael is right, that is the same as my covers except I only have one opening. ( sometimes one on top on one side and one on the bottom on the opposite side if I want to put a starter hive over a strong hive for the heat, then the cover acts as a top board for the lower hive and a bottom board for the upper hive. You can open or close it as you want.
    sterlingc

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    992

    Post

    Why go to the trouble of closing entrances. Bees wont fly as long as you are moving and if you move after dark wont fly out either and don't get as mad. I start nucs in Florida and move to new yard by sitting off splits on pallets and moving during day....loose very few bees.
    I HAVE FOR SALE two bee trailers that hold 16 hives each...all metal with angle iron bottoms. Slide in hive from each side and keep on trailer year around. Eliminates skunk problems and keeps dry. $500.00 ea or take both 900.00. I used metal banding to band down to move. I am now migratory using pallets or wouldnt sell them. Rick Email suttonbeeman677@cs.com if interested. Central KY.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    New Brunswick
    Posts
    103

    Post

    you are right about moving bees and not closing entrances. I recently inspected a bunch of hives that were moved about 160 miles and the guys moving them simply pick up the pallets with a fork lift and load them on a truck. One thing about not having the entrances closed is you don't have to put up with p-----off bees when you let them out.
    sterlingc

  13. #33
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    chilliwack, bc
    Posts
    659

    Post

    We use to move double brood nest hives w/honey super in the back of our ford 150. we were able to get twelve in when we used the mig lids. I hualed 16 double broodnest in my b2200 mazda double decked(8 on bottom and 8 on top).

    The only thing is that you need a fella with you to help load or unload, lend your beesuit to your freind and have him help you. It's tough trying to do this anyother way with a pick up truck when your by your self and have no ramp and cart. Once, being stuck to do pollenation with no one to help used lots of smoke and split the hives and loaded them one super at a time (they were heavy)tied them down for the drive and unloaded them the same way and after that long,nightmareish,evening i bought a 2 ton truck with tailgate lift and made a bee cart.

    singles are easiest to load and unload, but that goes with out saying.
    Will Gruenwald Chilliwack BC

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