Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 23 of 23

Thread: Winter Losses

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,197

    Post

    I've tried several methods of overwintering nucs but only one gives a high success rate. I divide a hive body into 3 compartments with something similar to a follower board and establish a 3 frame nuc in each of the 3 compartments. The nucs are started and kept on top of a strong and well established 2 story colony. Heat from the colony rises to keep the nucs alive. They have to be checked 2 or 3 times during the winter and additional combs of honey given if required.

    Fusion

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Post

    I have tried a medium 10 frame box on top of an inner cover with a double screen on the hole. The conensation from the hive below was a bad thing.

    Maybe I should do a solid 1/4" plywood so some heat can get through but not air.

    I was thinking of doing something similar to what I did this year, except put a chicken incubator thermostat in the bottom hooked up to several 20 watt light bulbs to heat the bottom.

    The top nucs are still doing great. It's the bottom ones that didn't make it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,197

    Post

    Height above the ground is important too. The nucs do better if they are at least 3 feet high. Its probably something to do with cold air and swirling wind down next to the ground.

    I never use a screened inner cover. As you noted, condensation is a real problem. I have solid plywood bottoms made for the nucs.

    Fusion

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads