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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    5,159
    MB - A few weeks ago you suggested that plantain applied after being stung would help. Well, after getting nailed a good one, I grabed a nice fresh leaf, tore it in half, rolled it up and tried to wring out some juice to apply to my newly acquired venomous injection.

    I thought I might have to get some pliers to squeze anything at all out of that leaf, but finally there came a bit of moisture and I rubbed it on the affected area.

    Relief was immediate, the area became numbed and never swelled or itched. It was just like it never happened.

    Let me say, "You da man!", or is that medicine man? Thanks for the tip!

    Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,889

    Post

    Glad to help. It's great on nettles stings or other irritations too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Bellingham WA USA
    Posts
    114

    Post

    ... you mean plantain - like the bannana wannabe?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    5,159

    Post

    Spelling is not my best suit

    Bill

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    College Station, TX
    Posts
    21

    Post

    Are we talking about that ugly little lawn/garden/roadside weed?
    http://www.cloudnet.com/~djeans/FlwPlant/CPlantain.htm

    I can't seem to get rid of the things, and you are telling me they work well for bee stings? What a beautiful plant!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,889

    Post

    Yes, that common weed that grows where everyone walks on your lawn. Shiny leaves, one seed stalk sticking up in the middle. Usually, because you mow, it doesn't get very big, but they get 12" across and 12" tall if you water them well and leave them alone. Usually when you see them they are three to four inches across.

    The web site link you gave has a perfect picture of it.

    To quote that site:

    "Medicinally, plantain is astringent, demulcent, emollient, cooling, vulnerary, expectorant, antimicrobial, antiviral, antitoxin, and diuretic. It effects blood sugar, usually lowering it. It has been used to treat lung disorders and stomach problems. For these purposes, a tea is made from either the leaves or the whole plant and taken internally. This same tea may be used as a mouthwash to treat sores in the mouth and toothaches. It may also be used externally to treat sores, blisters, insect bites and stings, hemorrhoids, burns, rashes, and other skin irritations.. Alternatively, a poultice of the leaves may be applied to the afflicted area. This is probably plantain's most common use. For relief from an insect bite, simply shred (or chew) a plantain leaf and hold it on the bite for a few minutes."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    Bullseye Bill,
    Instead of squeezing or wringing the leaf to get anything out of it, just put it in your mouth and chew it to a pulp. Then rub it over the bite.Only takes a few seconds and it really doesn't taste bad. I use plaintain leaves on my daughters mosquito bites also. She is 5 1/2 and can identify and bring the leaves in to me herself. One thing to remember when using plants in this manner is to make sure they have not been sprayed by any lawn chemicals.
    Denise

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,889

    Post

    >One thing to remember when using plants in this manner is to make sure they have not been sprayed by any lawn chemicals.

    They really taste awful if they have.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Lightbulb

    Ah! Living through better chemistry!

    Is it those preservatives that are keeping me preserved?

    Cliff Clavin was explaining the Buffalo Theory to his buddy Norm. Here's how it
    went:

    "Well ya see, Norm, it's like this... A herd of buffalo can only move as
    fast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it is the slowest
    and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection
    is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the
    whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members.
    In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the
    slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know, kills brain
    cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first.
    In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells,
    making the brain a faster and more efficient machine.!
    That's why you always feel smarter after a few beers."

    Bill

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    I love it! Now my father in law can claim he is the smartest man on earth, with a new theory to back it up.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Jonquière, Quebec (ABOVE 48th parallel North!!)
    Posts
    150

    Big Grin

    I Tried the Plantain thing this afternoon after a bee stung me on the wrist. I don't know if it was the plant or if the burning just happened to stop at that moment, but seconds after I applied it, I couldn't feel the stinging anymore. But it is not that good when you chew it... Lucky that there was a lot of raspberries in the surrondings

    Hugo

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Jonquière, Quebec (ABOVE 48th parallel North!!)
    Posts
    150

    Big Grin

    Sorry, I tried to write surroundings correctly before the message was submitted but I was too late ...

    [This message has been edited by abeille (edited August 14, 2003).]

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sandhills NC
    Posts
    111

    Post

    Isn't hosta a Plantian also? Would they work?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,889

    Post

    I have no idea. Plantain is everywhere and it's the only naturally available plant I've used. I have used asprin for a poltice and tobacco also, and they work well to draw out the poison of a sting.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    5TR--NO, Hosta is also known as plantain lily but it is not the same. The "snobby" name for hosta is 'liliaceae.'
    The plantain Michael is talking about is 'plantago major.'(wide leaved)or 'plantago lanceolata' (narrow leaved)

    Do not try the perennial plant known as hosta or pantain lily for stings and bites. At least don't chew it and try it.
    Denise

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