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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cheshire, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    56

    Post

    I will be making 2 hive splits tomorrow.
    I have not used the little plastic queen cages that Mann Lake sells. It looks like this is what my queens are in, so I am wondering how these install or are hung?
    Is there something I will need to remove?
    Are there any good links that show pictures of these cages being used?
    I don't want to mess up.
    Thanks for any advice!
    Bee Happy!<br />Lori<br /><br />\"You know, You never can tell with bees\". (Winnie The Pooh)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    If they are the ones from JZ BZ and have an extended tube on one end, the tube is pluged with candy and there is no cork.

    If you do not want the queen released right away, put a piece of tape over the candy.

    If you want her released in two to three days, just install the cage inbetween the frames. Between two well populated frames would be best.

    If you want to have her released in two days or less, drill a little hole in the candy. When they can see her on the other side of the candy they will remove it faster.

    There is also an excape hatch that you can open for direct release.

    Usually when there ARE attendants in the cage, you want the escape hole up so any dead attendants will not block the egress. Since there are none in your cage it is not important to point up. Another consideration is that there should be access to the queen through the ventilation holes for the bees to be able to feed the queen.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Alabama, SW Kentucky
    Posts
    1,914

    Post

    I've heard it suggested that the candy end of a queen cage should point down so the candy won't drown the queen should it melt. I'm not sure that ever happens, but I make it a practice to follow the advice.

    WayaCoyote
    WayaCoyote

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    The whole "up versus down" issue has been
    debated forever, but I think both sides
    have their heads up their... no, I can't say
    that here... ummm, "have serious cases of
    rectal-cranial impaction".

    Think about it - a queen cage in a vertical
    orientation has drawbacks no matter which
    way is "up". If "candy up", wayacoyote's
    concerns are valid. If "candy down", a
    dead attendant or two might block the
    exit hole.

    So, what to do? Horizontal sounds nice.

    I have a good supply of small strips of
    thin metal flashing that I attach to wooden
    queen cages with thumbtacks to suspend the
    queen cage between two frames. The only trick
    is to make sure that the screening is exposed,
    rather than up against comb.

    Another good trick is to remove the attendants
    from the queen cage when requeening. It is
    the attendants that most often make the bees
    in the colony "hostile" to the queen.

    With the plastic queen cages, I suspend them
    between two frames with a thin strip of
    duct tape, again with the cage in the horizontal
    position. If hung in the vertical position,
    these cages contain far less candy than the
    wooden type, so there is little chance of
    the candy melting and "getting on the queen".

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,763

    Post

    I always go horizontal with the screen down also. Nothing else quite makes as much sense does it? They can easily move a dead attendent out of the way horizontally. They can get to the screen easily. They can get to the candy easily. Even if the candy melted it can run out of the screen. I often use a scrap of #8 hardware cloth stapled on the back of a wooden cage like wings so it will hang between two bars and not fall. I only do that because there are scraps laying around. But I've also stapled cardboard or whaetever else was handy at the time. That's if I can get it between the top bars. Sometimes I use a Imirie shim and lay it on top of two top bars with the screen down between them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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