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Thread: Bee pests

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I have an old book from 1940 and it has some insects in it that he says are pests to bees that I have never herd of being a pest like The dragon fly and the Death's-Head Sphinx moth. It says that when there are a lot of dragon fly's out the bees wont fly as much. are these insects still a big problem in anywhere?
    The book is called THE GOLDEN THRONG and is by Edwin Way teale.

    Joseph Tona

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I'll ask a different question, has anyone ever herd of the death's-head sphinx moth? or herd of dragon fly's being a problem? the book said the death's-head sphinx moth is found in Europe

    Joseph Tona

  3. #3
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    Hello,

    Yes, dragon flys are carnivores to insects. I would think that it would take a large number of them to make a dent in and hive of honey bees. Dragon fly's don't attack a hive, but catches a worker bee while she is out foraging.

    As for the death's-head sphinx moth...I think it was the moth shown in "Silence of the Lambs". I'm not 100% on that one.

    I hope this helps.

    Billy Bob

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    Dragonflies will certainly take bees. The dragonfly books I've checked out in the UK list a very few large agile species as taking bees; the local ones are relatively weakflying, fly below the normal height of a foraging bee, and probably rarely get a chance. Last time I raised this one on BEE-L, I got quite a few accounts of US dragonflies being seen taking bees, but no specific names, which was what I really wanted. Allegedly, they will take queens on mating flights, but I've seen no real evidence that they do this more than rarely.

    I'm not sure about the death's head sphinx moth. Wedmore says that it's 'frequently listed as a pest, but is seldom found in numbers. By some it is regarded as seeking entry to the hive for warmth. In South Africa these moths have been found gorged with honey'. This isn't very satisfactory, but it sums up the case as far as I'm aware of it.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

  5. #5
    Maria & Theresa Guest

    Post

    What IS the normal height (altitude of a foraging bee?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    Very roughly, around 12-15 feet. at least at my site. It's very noticeable; most of them come out towards the hedge, rise quite fast, maybe circle round a time or two, then set off, all at about the same height. It only changes when there's a strong wind and they go hedge-hopping.

    ------------------
    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

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