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Thread: Tracheal mites

  1. #1

    Post

    I have read in some bee literature that FGMO and oxalic Acid will kill Tracheal mites, if that is the case why should I use menthol for the treatment of T mites.
    I use oxalic acid for varroa mites and menthol towels for T mites and have good success.

    Thank You

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Williston, NC, USA
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    Post

    FGMO takes care of both varroa and tracheal mites. I fog every 5 days (weather permitting--if bees are flying) with FGMO. That's it. My sticky board 24-hr count has consistently been between 3 & 7 mites and I'm seeing no symptoms of tracheal mites. Now if I could just find something to kill the dang yellowjackets!

  3. #3
    jfischer Guest

    Post

    If I had problems with tracheal mites, I would
    start calling queen producers, and buy queens
    from someone who has bred T-mite resistance
    into their queens.

    Some vendors have queens with excellent T-mite
    resistance, and some have none at all. If
    you ask, I assume that they will honestly
    answer, but you have to ask.



  4. #4
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    >I use oxalic acid for varroa mites and menthol towels for T mites and have good success.

    If you are having good success, then DONT STOP!! If it aint broke, then dont try to fix it,..
    If you ask me, the results of FGMO are to varried to rely on. Keep treating withe the tried and trusted until they bring FGMO right into perspective

    Ian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    Colora, MD, USA
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    Post

    And how does everyone know that FGMO, Oxalic Acid etc works on tracheal mites?? Are you doing your own testing at home with a microscope? As far as I know there are no "symptoms" for tracheal mites other than finding a dead hive in the middle of winter.

    If someone has some reliable info on Oxalic Acid killing T-mites, please let me know!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
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    Post

    American Bee Journal, Dec. 2004 issue page 921 Artical on Food Grade Mineral Oil. Conclusion, No Benefitin controling Varroa Mite. Are people doing extra work that just stresses the hive?

  7. #7
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Post

    >American Bee Journal, Dec. 2004 issue page 921 Artical on Food Grade Mineral Oil. Conclusion, No Benefitin controling Varroa Mite. Are people doing extra work that just stresses the hive?

    People who have used FGMO and not gotten results have moved on. People who have gotten good results continue to use it. I doubt there are people using it who haven't gotten results.

    I've used just FGMO fog and been quite pleased.

    Success or failure of any method is not in the broad statments like "FGMO works" "FGMO doesn't work" sucess or failure is all in the details.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
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    Lightbulb

    I do use a microscope and check for treacial mites and have found that FGMO works to keep down Treacial mites and varoa mites. It makes money for me and it works. I fog with FGMO with thymol mix once weekly when the bees are flying.
    I have been using FGMO for 3 years and it works for me.
    Clint

    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan
    Beekeeping sence 1964

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Williston, NC, USA
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    Post

    I do 24-hr mite drop counts on sticky boards to monitor varroa and there are never over 5 on the board so I feel FGMO is working well for me. It is my understanding that a bee infected with tracheal mites is not able to fly. Our inspector has told us too that in this area, it's not much of a problem.

  10. #10
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    >>Are you doing your own testing at home with a microscope? As far as I know there are no "symptoms" for tracheal mites other than finding a dead hive in the middle of winter.

    By leaving hives untested for T-mites, you will find your hives dead in the middle of winter,..
    Oxalic Acid has been proven to kill V-mites quit effectively, but not T-mites

    Ian

  11. #11
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    Sep 2004
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    Post

    According to the bee books, a symptom sometimes associated with tracheal mites is the disjointed or ‘K-wing’ seen on some bees. (That symptom, though, is also linked to nosema.)

    On the subject of tracheal mites, here’s a few paragraphs of interest from ARS magazine:
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archiv...4/bees1204.htm

  12. #12
    beewax Guest
    I use tea tree oil and it kills all mites

    ------------------
    Free ipods

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Kelowna, BC, CANADA
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    Post

    Just a thought - you can use formic acid to treat both your tracheal and varroa mites - at the same time. Cost and labour efficient and it works great!

    Good Luck!

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