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Thread: Feeding Bee's

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    ok, is it normal for 3 packages of bee's that were hived 3-11-05 that are on 12 acres of clover to keep taking sugar syrup, they were starting on new foundation and are building comb but are still all over the clover and still taking a quart jar a day per hive (3), is this normal for new hives, thought they might have stoped taking syrup by now?
    Ted

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Seattle, Washington State
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    Pretty much, when you buy a package of bees, yo uare commited to feeding them a lot. They need to draw out comb... and alots of it. So yes.. keep on feeding them. They need it. I also have a package of bees and they go through sugar water so fast. How are you feeding? I like to take a gallon bucket and feed them with the inverted bucket method. I do not need to replace the sugar water as much as I used to when using the quart jars.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Stronghurst,Illinois
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    Please exsplain the inverted gallon bucket method

    Drifter
    Some can learn by others mistakes , others have to whizz on the electric fence for themslves .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    I take a gallon bucket with a lid that fits tightly. I cut a small whole in the lid and take small mesh screen and cover the whole and connect it with glue. I place the sugar water in the bucket, put the lid on and take it to the beeyard.

    Than I take the outter cover off the hive, place two little peices of wood on each side of the hole on the inner cover, tip the bucket upside down so syrup will leak to the ground until it makes a vacum, place the bucket on the peices of wood, add a deep or a super and place the lid back on.

    It works for me!
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
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    716

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    I do the same as Chef but I use one gallon pickle jars. Just take a nail and punch a few small holes in the lid. The more holes the quicker they can take the syrup but takes more dripping to create a vaccum. It takes punching a few lids to get the happy medium. I have more lids than jars so I can haul them in the car without worry of a spill.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Central Square, NY, Oswego County
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    It takes 5 lbs of honey to make 1 lbs of wax. Bees will take down sugar syrup as long as you give it to them. I would keep feeding them till you have at least one and one half deep supers fully drawn out with bees occupying them and with brood. Once there is a full bloom of followers all around your hives then you can stop feeding. It also take a lot of room for the bees to evaporate nectar to make honey almost a super to make one super.
    Dan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Feeding Bee's

    Quote Originally Posted by Hillbillynursery View Post
    I do the same as Chef but I use one gallon pickle jars. Just take a nail and punch a few small holes in the lid. The more holes the quicker they can take the syrup but takes more dripping to create a vaccum. It takes punching a few lids to get the happy medium. I have more lids than jars so I can haul them in the car without worry of a spill.


    HillBilly, Do you put the pickle jar ontop of 2 pieces of wood on the inner cover?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
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    4,207

    Default Re: Feeding Bee's

    new gallon paint cans from HD or Lowes are cheap and easy. Take an ice pick or a nail and punch 3-4 holes and invert over a hole in the top. Quick and easy and they don't break.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,484

    Default Re: Feeding Bee's

    I use all sorts of bigger containers (2 gallon buckets from the local bakery, new paint cans, pickle jars) a 1/16th inch drill bit works good for making the holes in the lid. I normally do use small 3/4in scrap pieces of wood under the can so the bees can get to all the holes. But, you can just set it on the top bars if you have enough holes in the lid. I always try to set the feeder off to one side. I don't like it right in the middle over the cluster with the wide temperature swings we have here in the spring the feeder can sometimes burp and I don't want it to drip down on all the brood if this happens.

    The only draw back to feeding this way is you have to have a bunch of extra deep supers to cover up the feeders, other than that it works very good and you don't have to buy a bunch of feeders. You can use what you have on hand or is easily scrounged up.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,207

    Default Re: Feeding Bee's

    I use migratory covers with 2" holes in them. I don't bother to cover the cans at all.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,419

    Default Re: Feeding Bee's

    They will keep taking the syrup until the brood nest is backfilled and they swarm... if the clover is blooming, I would stop feeding.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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