Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    greer south carolina USA
    Posts
    157

    Default WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    I am fairly new to bee keeping i have had as many as 22 hives and as few as 5 in the last 10 years. I made 6 frame nucs 5 years ago. The 6 frame build faster in the spring and have a better survival rate. This last winter proved that to me. I went in to winter with 13 hives, 10 6 frame and 3 10 frame. Came out with 7 6 frame 2 10 frame one of the 10 framers swarmed in february and i found out in mid march and requeened my plan is to sell off my 10 frame and go all 6 frame. The only advantage i see in 10 frames is they do not tip as easy in the wind comments michael?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Peace River, AB Canada
    Posts
    456

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    You say your 6 frame nucs build up faster yet 50% of your 10 framers already swarmed!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Whitmell, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    Quote Originally Posted by seamuswildflower View Post
    The 6 frame build faster in the spring and have a better survival rate. This last winter proved that to me.
    I started last spring foundationless. Never owned a piece of it. One of the first things i learned when having bees in a 10 frame medium single is they build up fast up to the 6 to 7th frame and slow after that. So every box i've built is 7 frame mediums. I won't use a hive any wider.

    Six frames would work nice for them, even better five frames but you'd have to mount the hive on a post or something to hold it up.

    What they really would like is about three frames stacked eight feet high but that wouldn't be very easy to manage. Hives around here have been populated for decades in old house walls between the old rough cut 2x4's some 24" on center. The one's i've cutout span from plate to plate which is right at 8'.

    I went in to winter with 13 hives, 10 6 frame and 3 10 frame. Came out with 7 6 frame 2 10 frame one of the 10 framers swarmed in february and i found out in mid march and requeened my plan is to sell off my 10 frame and go all 6 frame. The only advantage i see in 10 frames is they do not tip as easy in the wind comments michael?
    Your average is still about 2 out of 3.

    A hive doesn't have to be fully drawn out to swarm apparently. I saw a guy's hive that he's had for three years and is a double deep 10 frame. The bees only filled out like 7 or so frames in the center of both of them. They swarmed every year according to him. They just refused to touch the outside frames. Some of it was the plastic stuff too though.
    Don't laugh it's paid for. -- Manure draws more flies than honey.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    greer south carolina USA
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    Quote Originally Posted by JD's Bees View Post
    You say your 6 frame nucs build up faster yet 50% of your 10 framers already swarmed!
    3 divided by 3 equals 1. 2 is 66 and 2/3 percent of 3. 33 and 1/3 percent of my 10 frame hives swarmed too early for survival. Lack of food and freezing weather equals death in the bee world! And how is this good? Timing is everything in the BEE BUSINESS!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    greer south carolina USA
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    my average is a 66 and 2/3 loss on the 10 frame and 1/3 on the 6 frame. half of the 6 frames are after August splits! ALL THE 10 FRAMES WERE STRONGER HIVES. MATHEMATICS WAS ALWAYS MY WEAKEST SUBJECT SO THIRDS IS THE BEST I CAN DO!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,806

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    With all the variables there are to beekeeping, I dare say you cannot draw concrete conclusions from your hive size/survivable rates.

    There are tons of studies out there concerning hive size and configuration, and yet, there is little concensus/agreement among beekeepers as to which is definately better. Likely has more to do with beekeeper preference than actual science.

    I actually like the 13 frame square hive configuration. Has both upside and downside, but survivability is little to no different than in 10 framers, 8 framers, etc. with the same conditions.

    I would recommend using hive size/configuration you like to work with, practice good hive management techniques, and balance it all with the equipment you have available.

    cchoganjr

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    I have observed better wintering in 8 frame boxes than in 10 frame boxes. So better wintering in 6 frame boxes wouldn't surprise me. This is also related to the race of bees. Italians are a bigger cluster in winter and are more prone to raise brood. Carniolans, Caucasians and Russians are more frugal and smaller clusters. You need to match the volume somewhat to the size of the cluster.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,806

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    And to Mr. Bush's point.... clusters relate to"normal" expected temperatures, moisture, pollen/nectar forage availibility, and on and on. What works for one region may or may not work for another region.

    I too would not be surprised if bees would winter better in 6, or 8, framers vrs 10 framers. But, wintering is just one factor in your bee operation. (Before someone jumps, yes, I fully realize that if they don't overwinter all other considerations are null) In making your decision you should consider race of bees, queens, temperment, swarming tendencies, honey produced, equipment availability, time and environment you can devote to keeping them, etc. How many migratory operators would want to work with 6 framers and have honey supers 6 ft tall.. They may sacrifice some overwintering to optimize their operations and the constraints they face in movement and placement of hives.

    A beekeeper will need to weigh all the options available, then decide which fits his/her situatiion best. What will work best for one beekeeper may well be a total flop for another. Practice whatever works for you.

    cchoganjr

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,806

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    Quote Originally Posted by seamuswildflower View Post
    The only advantage i see in 10 frames is they do not tip as easy in the wind
    seamuswildflower;913579 I would have to very respectfully disagree with this conclusion.

    Lets look at a couple of the advantages of 10 framers before we simply cast them aside. 1. Most obvious is the availability of 10 frame equipment, especially used and nearly new equipment. It isn't at all uncommon to find beekeepers going out of business and 10 frame equipment is the most common. Most common can result in lower prices. 2. For large number of hives, it takes fewer 10 framers than 6, or, 8 framers. 3. For honey supers it will require 5, 8 frame supers to have the same number of frames as 4, 10 frame supers, so you would be handling more supers.

    With each advantage also comes some disadvantages, so, see what works best for you.

    cchoganjr

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central Valley, CA, USA
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: WINTER LOSSES NUC vs 10 FRAME

    If you like to use DIVISION BOARD FEEDERS 10 Frame equipment gives you more options!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads