Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Northwest, PA
    Posts
    1

    Question

    I would like to rap my hives with some foam insulation to help them overwinter. I thought of using the sheet foam like is used in construction. My question is should I block off the lower entrance and provide one near the top of the hive? Ive heard that closing the bottem will help with moisture in the hive. But I'm concerned about leaving a hole near the top because of heat loss, any advise. Also wanted to say I just found this web site and was trilled when I first saw it I've learned alot from you all Thank You.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,340

    Post

    I've never wrapped hives, but the people who do seem to believe it makes a big difference. I always try to have an upper entrance in the winter because the snow can cover the bottom one. I don't know how long it would take for that to deprive them of oxegen, but it's likely that a warm day will come along before the drifts melt and the bees have no way to get out. I haven't tried closing the bottom one. I shrink it down quite small, but I don't close it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Mason, MI, USA
    Posts
    1,015

    Post

    I never close the bottom entrance. I leave a small mouse garded entrance at the bottom and a 3/4 inch hole at the top with a wiremesh across the hole leaving enough space for bees to get in and out. I wrap my hives with heavy black tar paper but leave the 2 entrances open for ventlation
    Clint


    ------------------
    Clinton Bemrose
    just South of Lansing Michigan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,762

    Post

    I wrap my hives in groups of four, with 4" insulation around the sides and 6" on top, wrapped with tar paper. I reduce the enterences come fall and open the top enterence in the inner cover. When I wrap I don't concern my self with covering the bottom enterence, because it gets covered with snow anyway. It is the top enterence that is the important one. It provides adequate ventalation and provides an enterence for bee flight. Moisture retention in the hive is deadly, so the bit of heat loss through the top vent hole is by far outweighed

    Ian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    I also put my hives in groups of four, but just put insulation on top (like houses, most heat goes through the roof). I use screen bottom boards that provide plenty of ventilation- so no hole at top. I think you get the best of both worlds this way... they stay warm since heat rises, yet they get air movement from wind.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,340

    Post

    I'm guessing that in Moutain Home, AR you don't get the bottom entrances covered with snow. You do here and you do in Manitoba. When you know the bottom of a hive could be buried in snow for weeks, it's a different matter. I know it probably won't last for weeks here, but it could and sometimes it has.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    Good point Michael- it snows a little here but not enough to completely seal off the hives. Guess every situation varies. No wonder screen bottom boards are no problem even in extremely cold climates... the snow covers and insulates from low temps. I recently switched to them- hope I don't have a problem with temps here.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    619

    Post

    As Micheal says; IT ALL DEPENDS

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads