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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    like it says in the title, I have some honey that has a farly strong taste of mint in it. I wonder how this will effect any mites in my hives.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Now how did you get to be a field bee?

    Field Bee

    Oh, lookie there, I am too!

    [This message has been edited by BULLSEYE BILL (edited August 23, 2003).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
    Posts
    769

    Post

    i have wondered about the mint in the honey too.I do not think it can hurt. i had one super with i hint of mint tast.I read here that it may have come from the bees working black locust trees.One never knows it just could be a way for the bee to fight mites.I have thought about planting mint just to see if it may help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,262

    Post

    Just add green food coloring and you'll have a uniqe new product to sell. I bet it's wonderful in teas........

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,545

    Smile

    Look around tere is probably MINT growing in your aera we have a lot of mint farmers south east of me ( to far for my girls ) and the honey has a strong tast of mint great for tea drinkers that sweeten tea with honey.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I have seen different types of mint plants growing around my area. I just didn't think I had enough of it to get the flavor to come through. Never thought of mint famers!! I could locate one and put a few of my hives on there land maybe, if there are any in California...
    I was just wonder since wintergreen oil is suposed to help against mites if the honey has anything special agains them.
    And the honey is almost clear and tastes really really good.:^)
    Joseph

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i've used a little peppermint and other mint oils in my sugar syrups for feeding and will occasionally notice a minty taste in some of the honey.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Texarkana, TX
    Posts
    168

    Post


    Howdy All -

    In the summers of 1938 and 1939 I worked
    for a beekeeper in Cameron Texas in an area
    with a lot of Horse Mint. It gave a definite
    minty flavor to the honey from some of his
    bee yards. Very good. There is a very small
    amount of that mint here in east Texas
    but not enough to flavor the honey.

    Doc

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,271

    Post

    I put hives on commercial peppermint fields.The honey is definitely bakery grade and I can only describe it as "rank".No mint flavor whatsoever.And it has no effect on varroa.Ive lost hives to mites while working peppermint.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Texarkana, TX
    Posts
    168

    Post


    Howdy Coyote --

    Beekeeping in those "ancient times" still
    worked on the same basics as today. You
    can manipulate bees now --- as long as you
    don't get too far from what nature provided
    for the bees (inherited knowledg).

    Commercial beekeeping was by hand. No
    pallets, forklifts, renting large numbers for
    pollination. Remember that this was in the
    great depression, so sale of honey was very
    limited.

    All real beekeepers are just as enthusiastic now as they when they started -
    maybe even after 69 years.

    Doc

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Hi
    The mint taste to my honey is from the locust trees that bloom around here in the spring . Honey is very very light yellow to clear and has the taste of mint you described. Walt

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Hi wjw

    Any chance that honey is basswood? I always think of locust as rather bland but basswood has deep mint overtones. However, up here locust is done blossoming three weeks before basswood even starts.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I think the plant that my bees got the honey from is called Sweet fennel there is a lot of it around here and the honey Is a light yellow colour and has a distingtive flavor that kind of tastes like the smell.
    heres a link to the some pictures of the plant: http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_...e=Sweet+Fennel

    Joseph

  14. #14

    Post

    I pulled my first crop off my hive yesterday! It was very minty and also a very light color. The honey was much more viscous than I expected. I am not in Berkeley, but San Jose, CA. I hope my family will enjoy the mint honey.

    The neighbor girl tried it and thought it tasted like toothpaste!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I'm right next to San Jose in the santa cruz montains. I don't want to say the name of my city but you probably know what it is. the same plants that are growing here might be growing over where you are, I see a lot of it growing on the side of highways and roads.
    do you go to the Santa Clara Valley Bee Guild?

    Joseph

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Hi Wineman,
    My area is like yours. Locust first and month later basswood. right after lucust blooms which we have a grove of them about 500feet from the hive. you could watch the bees on it unbelieviable.and than take honey off and very light yellow and slight mint. another beekeeper told me if i don't like it to mix it with fall honey and will make the fall honey light and the spring honey lose the mint taste. Im going to try it
    Walt

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Hi Wineman,
    My area is like yours. Locust first and month later basswood. right after lucust blooms which we have a grove of them about 500feet from the hive. you could watch the bees on it unbelieviable.and than take honey off and very light yellow and slight mint. another beekeeper told me if i don't like it to mix it with fall honey and will make the fall honey light and the spring honey lose the mint taste. Im going to try it
    Walt

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    Im a big fan of mixing honey. I dont really like a single floral source....you taste all the great aspects and all the horrible ones at the same time.....sorta like a wine.

    Locust mixes real nice with any combination of clover, thistle, basswood, alfalfa if you are trying to stay in the ligher range or with tulip, blueberry, goldenrod if you are looking for more body.


  19. #19

    Post

    Joseph, It's good to meet other local beekeepers. I haven't been to the Guild, but I didn't know there was an apiarist association here. Where can I find information about them?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    Just e-mail me you e-mail address at Jtjrson@aol.com and I can send you the news letter.

    Joseph

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