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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    1,725

    Post

    With all the loses in Cal. I was just wondering how all the pollination guys in here are doing with there hives, any big loses? anyone do real good? ect.
    Ted

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    8

    Post

    We are in Oregon and all our bees came through the winter with flying colors. We took them down to the almonds the 2nd week in Feb and are getting $100 dollars a colony as opposed to $50 we got last year. My husband went down to check on them yesterday so we'll see.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,360

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    Ours were fine last time we checked.We were there feeding early in the bloom.The bees were flying furiously between rain showers.We saw them pouring back into the hives loaded with pollen as the rain started.Quite a few were getting cold and wet and not making it into the hive.So if you see a few hundred dead ones in front of the hives ,thats what happened.An inspector told me he was seeing the same thing .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Central CA.
    Posts
    542

    Post

    Hi Mike the bloom is just about 1/2 over here. I fed yesterday, the rain has been keeping the bees in side almost all month.The bees are looking good and building up, but if they can't get out they will get hungery quick.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,360

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    Hey Jim,I think we had more flying weather in the north this year than where you are-usually its just the opposite.But I still fed a gallon of heavy liquid sugar to most of them to be safe.I think another week and it will be pretty much over in the north(but the growers will hang on till the very last flower before releasing them).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    2

    Post

    TwT - I'am here in Central Cal, about 30 miles south of Fresno, CA. I had two friends who lost a little over 60% of their hives to mites this winter. They say the survivors are building well.
    I had losses of just under 10% this year and the bees are building up good. However, many of my almond orchards that are almost finished blooming. In most of these orchards, the bloom lasted less than 21 days. I do think the growers here are going to set a decent crop. Most of the orchards in our area received about 1/2 the rain, orchards 60 to 90 miles to the north received. Bob

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Post

    So did they end having enough bee's to pollinate correctly , I understand the weather has been bad over there and I have seen where they brought in aussie bee's from down under. just wondered
    Ted

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    2

    Post

    TwT - Most of the orchards in my area had enough bees. Although we had rain for most of 2 weeks, the rain was coming out of the tropics and our daily highs stayed in the 60's. I did have a grower call looking for 2000 colonies a week before bloom. A friend of mine has some connections in Minnesota and got bees for the grower for $90.00 a hive.
    I had not heard about the Aussie's sending bees. Bob

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,360

    Post

    I cant believe a package would make a good pollinating hive.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    That was my thoughts as well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Central CA.
    Posts
    542

    Post

    How many #s of bees do you think there are in
    8 frames? Isn't that the standard?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    McMinnville, TN, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post

    Well the 3lb packages I got 2 years ago only covered about 3 frames. Within 2 weeks there was only enough to cover 2 frames before they started building back up.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,360

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    I doubt if they would cover 8 frames for long.In my experience ,packages will begin to lose population rapidly ,then pretty quick the remaining bees are sitting in the hive sucking syrup and incubating brood..Starting them on drawn comb on almond bloom would certainly benefit the bees,but I have never seen a package hive that could put out the foragers that a good overwintered hive full of bees and brood can.I can see why a desperate grower would want ANYTHING but if it were me I sure wouldnt pay the same price as for an 8 frame overwintered hive .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,349

    Post

    If losses are in the 40 -50% range like some reports are indicating, will beekeepers forego the honey crop in an attempt to rebuild numbers? Was there a shortage of hives for almond pollination? If so I imagine prices paid to beekeepers should hold for next season especially particular if fruit bearing acreages are increasing. I imagine there will be a below average honey crop in 2005 if indeed 50 % of the commercial pollination hives are lost and beekeepers attempt to make up the hive losses. I can't really see why all theother hives would not have similar losses. It seems that the U.S.A. will have a short crop and prices and demand should be good especially for white honey. That should be good for Canadian producers.

    Jean-Marc

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,360

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    There were definite losses but not everyone was hit hard.I think the price will steadily increase not only because of the increasing almond acreage ,but also because of the inflationary increases in operating expenses.I hope the Canadians get a good crop of honey AND a good price,but unless China can be reigned in somehow,honey prices will not keep up.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,360

    Post

    >How many #s of bees do you think there are in
    8 frames?
    Joe Traynor in his book figures 8 frames at around 15000 bees.So if there are 4000 per pound that is 3.75 pounds.If there are 4500 per pound that is 3.3 pounds-so its fairly close.

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