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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Question

    We know that bees can be regressed to small (natural) cell to help control v-mites. We know that a smaller cell will forcable make a larva develope smaller body characteristics. But are there actual genetic qualities, maybe through an evolution, that are changes in queens, drones, or brood that ultimately a "regressed queen" eventually supercedes?

    Workers build regressed brood for worker cells, do they build regressed supercedure queen cells? Regressed drone cells?

    If so, could bought queens be too large to accept regressed hives? Could they be too big for the hive to accept the queen?
    -I know right off the bat that someone is going to say that I have a regressed hive and I bought a new queen and she was accepted, but maybe there's a chance that someone else didn't have sucess and it's attributed to regressed expectations of the hive?

    If regression is purely a product of workers building cells that squash larva until they're regressed, wouldn't the entire hive be impacted? :confused:
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    >But are there actual genetic qualities, maybe through an evolution, that are changes in queens, drones, or brood that ultimately a "regressed queen" eventually supercedes?

    You can't evolve bees. IF that happens, it takes millions of years. You can select from what's here. You can pick bees that are willing to make smaller cells instead of bees that are wiling to make larger cells. But I wouldn't count on that for much. Even that takes years of work to get anywhere.

    >Workers build regressed brood for worker cells, do they build regressed supercedure queen cells?

    I don't see much difference in queen cell size.

    >Regressed drone cells?

    In my observation, drone cells vary to both larger and smaller in natural sized bees.

    >If so, could bought queens be too large to accept regressed hives?

    I've seen one out of several hundred now that couldn't or wouldn't lay in small cell.

    >Could they be too big for the hive to accept the queen?

    Only if she doesn't lay. That one, they superceded quickly and they were happy after that.

    >-I know right off the bat that someone is going to say that I have a regressed hive and I bought a new queen and she was accepted, but maybe there's a chance that someone else didn't have sucess and it's attributed to regressed expectations of the hive?

    As long as the queen is laying fine, the workers seem happy with her, regardless of size.

    >If regression is purely a product of workers building cells that squash larva until they're regressed, wouldn't the entire hive be impacted?

    Dee Lusby says they are. I don't see any evidence of queen cells or queens being noticably smaller, although I have had a couple of queens from small cell hives run through a hair clip queen catcher. So maybe they are smaller or maybe it's just these feral bees that are smaller.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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