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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    457

    Post

    Chef Issac,

    Haven't you moved back to Washington (the State) from Oregon? If so, you might want to update your profile.

    Pugs

  2. #22
    AC Guest

    Post

    Beeman,

    Tell your wife the website looks good. I will give you a few suggestions on how you can improve your site (if you feel like it) otherwise just ignore them. Only a few.

    1. Add a robots meta tag. </font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;">&lt;meta name=&quot;robots&quot; content=&quot;index,follow&quot;&gt;
    </pre>[/QUOTE]as the very first meta tag under </font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;"> &lt;head&gt; </pre>[/QUOTE]2. I would use a style sheet instead of a tag just to make the site load fasater.

    3. Take the keywords out of the description tag. I mean use as many as you can just not in a keyword format. Actually describe your site in an logical way using as many keywords as possible. Look Here see how your title is on the page. google is ignoring your description. Use that title in the description but you can get several more sentences.

    4.I would make the text "You'll be redirected to the National Honey Board" smaller to eliminate the sideways scrollbar at 800x600.

    Thats my opinion, again I mean no offense just some helpful suggestions on how to make a great site better.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Gosh, I remember when web sites didn't have pictures... or anything but HTML in them. That was back in 1985 and you could "browse" the entire World Wide Web in less than an hour. I even did it a few times! I remember thinking . o O ( hey... this could get big...)

    Now, I wouldn't say I'm a purist, but I do like simpler sites that don't suck up my limited bandwidth- either that of my modem, or my brain. I used to (for 10 years or so) build web sites- mostly backend CGI stuff and putting databases (or information in them) online- my favorite combo was Mysql and Perl but the last company I worked for ended up going (gah!) with Oracle and Tcl before ultimately downsizing their guts out. Now I keep bees and work for a guy building post and beam buildings.

    Anyways, I digress. I like websites with a high signal-to-noise ratio i.e., high on content and low on junk, fluff, ads and other time-wasters. I tolerate pop-ups about as much as I tolerate dog bites.

    I've also always used what I call the 10-second rule: If a home page takes more than 10 seconds to load, I hit the back button. This says as much about my attention span as it does my bandwidth [img]smile.gif[/img] If I'm interested in the site anyways, sometimes I'll let it load. I love pictures and love to download them, and love to take my own and post them for other folks to look at. Pictures can take time to load and I make exceptions to my 10-second rule for pictures, usually. Someday I'll get a broadband connection and I'll be able to really pull down them graphics and look at all those sites I've never seen because I had to hit the back button..

    Lastly, I absolutely positively HATE to click more than 3 times to get to the information I want. I'm a firm believer in sensible navigation.

    I have a web site. I've always had a web site, someplace, since 1986. For 10 years I ran my own servers, utilizing bandwidth paid for by the company I worked for. It was great! Now I've simplified things and instead of running a few networks, I run my own laptop. My latest web site is about beekeeping, naturally. A friend hosts it for me.

    The site has only been up for about a month. I play with it when I get the chance, which isn't very often these days. I'll have more time during the winter. I expect to make some sales contacts via my site, someday, but I don't have any great expectations. I'll probably never have a shopping-cart enabled site where I take orders and credit card numbers though ironically, I used to build them.. but I've also learned never to say never. So we'll see. I'll certainly be happy to do as much business as possible via email. For now, my web site is a means of self expression and information dissemination and I'd encourage Chef and anyone else half-interested to setup their own web site and give it a whirl.

    George-
    --------------------------------
    George & Nancy Fergusson
    Whitefield Maine
    http://www.sweettimeapiary.com/
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,513

    Post

    I have a web site
    I like it. Fast, clean, humorous.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Hehe... BeeBear was kind enough to point out an error in my post. 1986 was when I got my first internet account and I first "heard" about the WWW in 1989, it was going to be "bigger than Gopher" and bring the internet "to the masses". It was more like 1990 before the first web browser came out and the world wide web was actually something you could look at. It was 1991 when I started playing with HTML.

    FWIW, which ain't much.

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    307

    Post

    The first web browser came out in March, 1993.

    http://www.blooberry.com/indexdot/history/mosaic.htm

    I still have a vivid memory of "watching" the comet crash into Jupiter in that timeframe, the first demonstration that I had of the coming potential of the WWW. http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/sl9/ I never dreamed that in less than a decade it would change the way that many people in the world get information.

    So, to add my comments to this thread . . . yes, I believe that a web site is worth the trouble. However, it's quite possible to have a lousy web site that actually sours people on your business. If you can't do a decent job, best not to bother.

    "Decent job" to me means a clean site that contains concise and current information. Think what your potential customers are trying to achieve by going to your site, and meet those goals. Lose the dancing graphics and cutesy stuff -- to me this is just clutter that keeps me from finding what I need. And don't put up a site and forget about it unless you stick with the basics that don't change. I really hate to visit a site that contains information that is obviously outdated; that's the kind of thing that would send me elsewhere.

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