Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: how many hives

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Big Grin

    how do you know how many hives to have per yard? I was at my association meeting and the speaker said he had 1000 hives in many different yards. I forgot to ask, can anyone tell me how to judge.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    how do you know how many hives to have per yard? I was at my association meeting and the speaker said he had 1000 hives in many different yards. I forgot to ask, can anyone tell me how to judge.

    reply:

    You really don't know. Make a reasonable guess. Ask yourself is there clovers and others nectar yielding plants? If yes start with 15-20 colonies. You can add more later or take away. If you have acres and acres of evergreens start with 5-10 colonies then zero in. If colonies consistently are short on winter store then reduce numbers(make sure the beekeeper isn't taking the bees cut or beekeeper error). As for 1000 hives per yard this sounds like a migritory beekeeper who is stashing hives for winter not honey production.

    Clay



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,508

    Post

    I quote from, "Productive Management of Honey-Bee Colonies" by C. L. Farrar.

    "Apiaries should be located where there are ample acreages of major honey plants within 2 miles, and where the total vegetation provides rich sources of pollen and secondary nectar plants throughout the growing season. Within a 2-mile radius there are more than 8,000 acres of land, which will usually pasture 50 colonies if only a small percentage of the area supports plants producing pollen and nectar. In some regions it is advantageous to choose a permanent site rich in pollen sources during most of the growing season, then move the colonies to a temporary location rich in major honey plants for a flow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    smethport, pa usa
    Posts
    39

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rainesridgefarm:
    how do you know how many hives to have per yard? I was at my association meeting and the speaker said he had 1000 hives in many different yards. I forgot to ask, can anyone tell me how to judge.

    Thanks
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    read all the books you can but common sense and experience is your best teacher first how many hives are you going to manage , then split them between locations and a rule to remember keep equipment separated from each location, why because if you have any problems they will be contained in that apiary, keep them separated until you can evaluate your hives with confidence.. hey i didnt even quote from a book, joel

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,304

    Post

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rainesridgefarm:
    how do you know how many hives to have per yard? I was at my association meeting and the speaker said he had 1000 hives in many different yards. I forgot to ask, can anyone tell me how to judge.

    Thanks
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Hi,
    The speaker probably meant he had maybe 33 beeyards with 30 hives per yard or something similar.Thats pretty common for commercial honey producers.I dont know any who would fool with a yard that couldnt support that many or more.There are just too many variables to give a pat answer to the question.After many years you will be able to tell a good area just by driving by.And here in bee-rich California,it will probably already have too many hives in it!!I know one summer location that has 3 beekeepers putting in over 200 total within a mile of each other and all do well,while the alfalfa is in bloom.During Cal.almond bloom,mile after mile of blooming almond trees will have from 1to4 hives per acre.No surplus,but will maintain as long as the bloom lasts.There are areas of heavy blooming wild plants where you could put 500 in a yard in a good year and all would do good for a month,but then would starve if not moved .Thats the trick for getting honey,if the plants fail to yield,MOVE,unless you know another good species is coming in to bloom.
    -Mike


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads