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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sebastopol, CA, USA
    Posts
    29

    Post

    Anyone know any beekeepers in West Bengal, India? I'll be going there soon and am trying to find out about beekepers in tha area of Kalimpong and Darjeeling. Yes, that's where the tea comes from. I understand that they have introduced apis melifera, but also keep apis cerana.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    I don't think you'll find many beekeepers
    in India, they are too busy stealing American jobs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,800

    Post

    So that's why our unemployment is so high!!Thanks for figuring it out for us..... all 936 million Indians are here in the US stealing our jobs. That must be why traffic is so bad too...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    If I wanted to locate a beekeeper in India, I would contact American Bee Journal and see if they could give me any leads. They publish lots of articles on beekeeping around the world, and probably have an author that travels extensively for this purpose. I seem to remember reading an article in one of the mags last year about beekeeping in India, but I don't have the mag anymore. Sorry.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    .



    [This message has been edited by The Honey House (edited June 17, 2003).]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sebastopol, CA, USA
    Posts
    29

    Post

    Thanks for the referral to the Bee Journal, I'll check it out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    i've traveled thru asia quite a bit and you will be amazed to see large open comb colonies hanging from trees and buildings,they are apis cerana, i presume.also in markets you will find people selling wild comb and sometimes even larvae to eat.i would guess if you go to a market,you will find a local beehunter if not a beekeeper.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    The ABJ sitting on my desk just happened to be opened to Beekeeping In India:an exotic adventure-Part 1.It is the Dec.2001 issue.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Post

    The author is Dr.Wyatt A. Mangum email wmangum@mwc.edu

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sebastopol, CA, USA
    Posts
    29

    Post

    hoosierhiver: Actually, that would be apis dorsata living under cliffs and branches. This is a larger bee that is not domesticated. Apis cerana is quite small and lives well in hives, but does not produce as much honey.

    Thanks for the article referral! I knew one of you would know where to go!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    dorsata, thanks for the correction.

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