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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    portland
    Posts
    85

    Post

    A friend and I have about 5 gallons of honey to harvest this year and bottle.

    What is the easiest way to heat the honey up so it won't chrystalize? We don't have an old freezer to convert... and we don't want to heat each bottle up individually.

    Any suggestions? Should we invest in one of those 5 gallon bucket strap on heaters?

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    623

    Post

    Just a thought but would a water bed heater for this.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,729

    Post

    It will taste much better if you don't heat it. I never do until AFTER it crystalizes IF it crystalizes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lynnville, Ia, USA
    Posts
    165

    Post

    The strap heaters are a bum deal. The heat in too concentrated in one area. When we first atarted bottling honey, we made a plywood box and lined it with styrofoam. Any kind of sheet insulation will work, though. We used a 75 watt lightbulb for a heat source. We had the light bulb on a timer. It gets too hot if the light bulb is on all the time. Untill we figured out the heat cycle, we used an indoor outdoor thermometer to monitor the temperature of the honey. If you have a bottling bucket with a spigot at the bottem, you can just take the bucket out of the heater and bottle the honey. The box was just big enough to hold a five gallon bucket.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Milford, NJ, USA
    Posts
    73

    Post

    I used a good cardboard box (from a dehumidifier) big enough to fit the five gallon bucket with plenty of room around. I wired a 90 watt lamp and a switch that cuts off the power to the light at a certain temperature (if you don't have such switch, I would just set a 40 watt lamp or even 25w and leave on all the time, and see what temperature you get inside the box). I set it to about 80F-85F. During the Winter, when the room was at about 50 degrees the light was on often (hating up the room too...), but now obviously is not. Just take the obvious precautions so that the bulb is not too close to the cardboard. I also put a couple of bricks on the bottom so that the buckets are off the floor allowing for more air circulation. For the top I cut a 1/2 piece of foam insulation I had sitting around. If you want it fancy, make a box of plywood and put foam insulation in the inside!
    Alejandro

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