Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Southeast Missouri
    Posts
    14

    Smile

    We captured a wild swarm last spring and I assume the queen is old because from what I understand the old queen leaves with the swarm. So these bees are gentle and seem to produce alot of honey, so what is a mild tempered well producing queen? Also when is the best time to requeen in the spring? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,747

    Post

    Many beekeeper requeen as a religion, I dont so much. But, keep in mind, I dont pollinate, and dont work my hives year round.
    Why replace the queen? I think if she is rearing the nest alright, just let her alone. I have some hives sitting in the same spot for over 5 years now. I never requeened them, and they always pump out the honey. I think the bees have a good handle on this, let them do their jobs. I never requeen my swarms. You know, sometime the old swarmed queen gets superceeded within weeks of establishing here brood nest anyway, so you might be requeening a new queen,...
    Just my opinion
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,313

    Post

    I'm with Ian. First, she might be really good genetics from some survivors. If not, she still might be fair genetics from a domestic hive. And she may NOT be an old queen at all. The PRIMARY swarm has the old queen in it, all subsequent afterswarms have a new virgin queen in them. If the queen is doing well, why not let her?

    Some people requeen in the spring, some in the fall. Queens are cheaper and easier to get in the fall. Either works for the bees.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    I re-queen every other fall. With today's pest/disease problems I figure 6-7 dollars a year is a cheap way to:

    1. Improve disease resistance and pest resistance through genetics.
    2. Improve hive health with hygenic bees.
    3. Keep honey production up through maintaining strong hives and a young healthy queen that I don't have to worry about running low on sperm helps with that.

    I feel re-queening helps prevent problems rather than waiting until you have a problem then trying to fix it.

    BubbaBob

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,747

    Post

    sometimes it is the beekeeper who creates the problem to begin with

    to each is their own

    Over my colony operation, I count on 2-5% complete hive failures, fall shakeouts. I do attribute this to queen problems, but 5% is penuts overall.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    Two years ago my intention was to requeen every fall. Last year I didn't buy any queens or packages and still increased %200. I was wanting to see how the NWC I installed the previous year would do for me.

    This year I want to inject some of the newly developed blood lines into my yards so I ordered the PBA queens.

    Going cold turkey off the chems, and letting nature select the survivors is a hard task. I have about %15 loss so far this winter so I am optimistic. Now if I could just get them to stop robbing...
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    wills point,tx,usa
    Posts
    130

    Post

    beegirl, i dont replace my swarm q's because i want to see if they have mite tollerance. however, i requeen every year and i may a good producing swarm as a breeder ( i graft my own q's) young q's have more pheromones which reduces swarming. i have a swarm from last year that i will use for a breeder this year because it was an excellent producer last year and this weekend i found it has 2 q's living together.
    choose your q's for what you plan on doing with your bees...
    *italians produce more brood throughout the year(good for chasing the flows and early polination; but, consume lots of stores)
    *carniolans slow or cease brood rearing in fall and are good conservers of stores; build up fast in spring once they get started(good if you have stationary hives and dont want to feed much in winter.
    *i dont know much about the other races of bees, but have heard 3 different commercial guys that have said they dont like the russians because of low production (i do know a commercial guy that uses them and has for the last several years, but dont know how he feels about them.)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Monte Vista, CO 81144
    Posts
    244

    Post

    I re-queen only when my my queen has gets tired of my double wide. Mexico has the best genes I have found.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,747

    Post

    My neighbour has been bringing Russian genetics into his stock, and has not complained about decreased honey production. He is crossing them with area select genetics and has been finding mite tolerance. in his stock.
    I too have heard of decreased honey production from Russians, but this guy made out as if it wasnt even a factor
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Hi Ian:
    Last spring I hived four packages with Russian queens. They didn't do as well as the Carniolans I hived. It could have been location. But two of the packages were hived in a spot where a good crop had been produced in the past. Just an observation.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads