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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    1,443

    Post

    Hi folks. Is it a good idea to pull out frames, use a wide paint brush to brush sugar water (thick) deep into the cells? This would eliminate need for boardman feeders, and would not require purchasing frame feeders. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
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    1,848

    Post

    Hi FordGuy--if you want to place thick liquid into the cells use a can with a lot of punched holes in bottom, place honey or thick sugar water into the can and sort of like a watering can drizzle the liquid into the cells, use a small nail and punch a lot of holes!
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

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    umm, FordGuy,
    seems like a lotta work
    why don't you just rig up some kind of hivetop feeder
    it can be as simple as inverted clean paint cans on the top cover
    I think it's the bee's job to put it in the cells [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    North Texas, USA
    Posts
    61

    Post

    FordGuy,
    What you describe worked well for my
    brother-in-law when his bees were near
    starvation in spring, but he's in MI
    In the Carolinas, I think drobbins is right
    about the hive-top feeder being easier.
    “It is only as the intelligence of man moves along harmoniously with<br />the laws of Nature, that any improvement can be expected.”<br /><br />G. M. Doolittle

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada, North of the 50th Parallel
    Posts
    217

    Post

    Tried Power-Napper's method this past spring and it worked really great
    Happiness comes from within

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    895

    Post

    I also on occasion use a spray bottle to fill the cells up for emergency feeding. I have also filled the cells with sugar and then sprayed the sugar water on top of it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chesterfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1

    Post

    To Rod - I like your idea of putting sugar into the cells and then spraying sugar water on top - Question: doesn't the sugar need to be dissolved so the bees can process or eat it better or does the sprayed-on sugar water eventually dissolve the sugar? I looked at the frames in the bottom box and found them empty of everything yet the upper box is filled with bees and capped honey. Your method would/might be easer and faster.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    PermaComb is solid enough you can even heat the syrup (as long as it's not more then 200 F or so) and dip it into the syrup. It's still quicker to fill the feeders and keeps the bored bees busy moving it around.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Phoenix, Az.
    Posts
    64

    Post

    wouldn't this just be a quick invatation for mold to start growing all over the place?

    the feeders sould like a uch better and easier idea. that and you can always clean them if they get too dirty. I don't think I'd want to try and clean a drawn out fram thats gotten moldy.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

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    Hi guys - thanks for all the replies - here's my reasoning:

    it is mid November. Soon food on top of the hive, or food on the landing board, or food in a hive top feeder will draw the cluster to a dangerous place where they risk being frozen/stranded. This late in the year, I am concerned about feeding a cluster, not individual bees. The only way to feed a cluster is - with food in frames. OK Mr. Bush, tell me how I am wrong...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    895

    Post

    If you spray enough sugar water on the sugar it dissolves it pretty good, and if the bees have some nicer days, 50s then they can fly out and get water to dissolve it more or use condensation in the hive. My idea isn't best case senario it's more emergency in nature.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Post

    &gt;it is mid November. Soon food on top of the hive, or food on the landing board, or food in a hive top feeder will draw the cluster to a dangerous place where they risk being frozen/stranded. This late in the year, I am concerned about feeding a cluster, not individual bees. The only way to feed a cluster is - with food in frames. OK Mr. Bush, tell me how I am wrong...

    Not at all. It will work. It's messy and a lot of work. Just remember the bees need some empty combs to cluster on. It's only the edges of the cluster that actually consume food. Unless they are on empty comb they can't get enough density of bees to stay warm. The other issue, mold, you can take care of by adding a bit of citric acid or ascorbic acid to the syrup. I buy the 1000 mg vitiman C tablets and throw seven of them in two and a half gallons of water before I boil the water when I'm making 2:1 syrup. You can find the citric acid in the section with the canning jars at the grocery store. A slight shift in the pH to acidic seems to stop the mold.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
    Posts
    1,966

    Post

    They will use feed from the frames long after they will no longer go to any other feeder.

    Dickm

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Athens, Ill
    Posts
    141

    Post

    I have been doing the same thing this year. I am glad to hear that others have tried it and it worked. Ya'll are right about it being a messy job. My next attempt was to try dry sugar, and wet it down in the comb, again I am glad to see someone else has tried it and it worked.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    regarding ascorbic or citric acid, can't you just squeeze a lemon into the mix?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Yes, some people use lemon to prevent the syrup from molding. Seems like the citric would be less likely to add somthing that might cause dysentary or contribute to it molding.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    South East Missouri
    Posts
    61

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    When the temp gets cold (in the low 40's) I don't pull any frames. If I find a hive that is to lite, what I use is a ziplock bag with about 6 lbs of sugar and 1 and 1/2 cup of water, mix, cut some small slits in the botom and lay it on top of the frames.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,341

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    The typical ziplock bag method is to cut the slits in the TOP not the bottom. I'm afraid you'll drown a lot of bees with the slits in the bottom.

    http://www.beesource.com/eob/baggie.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    South East Missouri
    Posts
    61

    Post

    MB you just put enough water with the sugar to make it stick together. It want come out by it's self, the bees have to take the sugar out. With it on top of the frames the cluster can move up under and use it when it's to cold to use any other feeder.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
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    Pat, having used this ziplock method all year long, i can't imagine the liquid staying in if i turned it upside down. do you just poke little holes? a slit would dump massive amounts of goo onthe frames, throughthe SBB then onthe ground.

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