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Thread: Cloudy Honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Clifton Park, NY, USA
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Hi, everybody
    My problem is this: About 3 weeks ago I bottled all of my honey. I stored it in our canning closet, cool dry and dark. It was very clear when I bottled it but now it is cloudy looking. I thought it might have been crystalizing but I put some bottles in hot water and they didn't clear up at all. What is happening to my honey ?

  2. #2

    Post

    Open a jar up and see if gas escapes. You will have to listen very carfully. Depending on when you extracted and if all the cells where capped it could be fermenting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

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    If it doesn't smell yeasty and it tastes all right, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Was it pretty runny when you bottled it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Clifton Park, NY, USA
    Posts
    133

    Post

    Hi again,
    My honey was pretty thick when I bottled it and all the cells were capped. everything that touched the honey was rinsed in were hot water then air dried. I just opened up a jar and it was not under any presure, no gass escaped, and it smells and taste good. It looks like there is very small white flakes of something in it. But it was very clear going into ther jars.

  5. #5

    Post

    your honey is starting to crystalize. Some honey just does it faster then others. If you used cheesecloth to help filter it, it will speed up the process. It is perfectly good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

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    Hi,

    Hmmm............sound like you got some aster/ goldenrod honey. You will find that your fall crop in NY granulates quickly. I turn such honey into creamed honey so as not to fight it. Blend in a little white dutch clover to the aster and it makes excellent tasting creamed honey.

    If granulation isn't the problem....could you have fine wax particles in the honey? How did you extract the honey? More info?


    Clay

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Clifton Park, NY, USA
    Posts
    133

    Post

    I don't have an extracter, so I just uncapped the frames and let them drain for about a week. After that I crushed up the combs to get the last of the honey out. I then let the honey settle for about a few days. After that I put the honey through a plastic double strainer that I got from betterbee. I never heated the honey or any thing else. It was clear going into the jars, But now cloudy. We have been eating the honey for ourselfs and it taste good. Should we sell any of it ?

    [This message has been edited by Frohnho (edited November 30, 2002).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

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    Only watered down honey or honey that's not ripe (read dry enough) will ferment and if it's not wtered down enough to frement it will keep forever. Honey is the only food that never spoils. Of course every insect and animal seems to want it and will carry it off if you don't protect it. I wouldn't worry about selling it or eating it. It may be that it is crystalizing and maybe the creamed honey idea would be good. I don't have that much experience with goldenrod honey or others that are prone to crystalization. Generally my honey crystalizes when it's kept too cool for too long, but that usually takes a year or more anyway.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Harrison, NY, USA
    Posts
    261

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    So, can somebody explain the "science" of honey cristalization? I had thought that ALL honeys that are not watered down or heated up will cristalize rather sooner (one month or so) than later.
    Does it depend on mode of extraction?
    Does it depend on flower type? I guess from Clay the answer is yes. Then, what is it about the flower that does it?
    Does it depend on density? I guess the answer should be 'definitely yes' since just about anything will cristalize at high enough concentration.
    Is it depend on the wax and other particles left in there after extraction?

    Thanks
    Jorge

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

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    I have not tried to cause it to crytalize except in small experiments on creamed honey, but here's my experience. I don't heat it in any way other than I might get the kitchen hot (90 to 95 degrees F) when I'm extracting. Mine usually doesn't crystalize until it's about a year old. Others seem to think certain nectars cause early crystalization and the story I hear is that the creamed honey is from using honey from a particular nectar that makes small crystals as seed for other honey to crystalize. Apparently there are people with much more experience at having it crytalize than me. I will leave it to them to share their experiences.

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