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  1. #1

    Exclamation

    I was just at a local grocery store where they sell "ORGANIC" Honey. It is produced by Y.S.Organic Bee Farms. How do you keep your bees from foraging on non-organic plants?? I'm really dewildered here.
    Thanks
    Matthew

  2. #2

    Smile

    It is not so much what the bees feed on as it is the managment of the hives. No chemicals can be used in the treatment of the bees. you are alowed to use certain oils like pepperment or vaporized vinegar. but they must be certified organic as well. Some larger organic farms do supply enough forage to keep the bees on organic ground but that is very difficult to control.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Marietta, Georgia USA
    Posts
    58

    Post

    Mattew,
    What are you doing in Moscow?

    Andrey.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    See http://www.beesource.com/pov/organic/index.htm If I remember correctly ther mustn't be any non-organic cultivation within ix miles of the hive, which will rule out almost everyone.

    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,432

    Exclamation

    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rainesridgefarm:
    you are alowed to use certain oils like pepperment or vaporized vinegar. but they must be certified organic as well.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Greetings -

    It should be pointed out here that the Organic guidelines you are stating above, allowing oils, is from the European standards, not the U.S. The European standards DO NOT apply to the U.S. The Organic standards for honey in the U.S. are still being drawn up and there are many that will hold the line allowing NO USE of oils, acids or anything at all. Please be careful giving advise on laws and rules that don't apply here.

    Regards,
    Barry

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    The following was posted on the discussion group Biological Beekeeping today. (to join this group for daily discussion please see how on this site posted elsewhere or http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BiologicalBeekeeping )

    Hi all

    This is to let you know that I checked today with Washington. D.C. and also
    the National Honey Board on the status of the upcoming Federal Register on
    proposed Organic guidelines for the beekeeping industry.

    To date it is still in the planning process and it will be discussed at the
    upcoming meeting of the National Honey Board.

    Therefore right now the only laws on the books are the ones published by the
    European Union for Organic Standards, which as you all know, DO NOT APPLY AS
    LAW in the United States, as our Organic laws are still being discussed and
    formulated for the Federal Level.

    Rest assured, I will let all here know when the Federal Register comes out
    for comments.

    We ourselves (husband and I) will be holding for zero tolerance now having
    and holding 700+ colonies without the usage of essential oils, acids, drugs,
    and chemicals for physical evidence it can be done!

    Regards:
    Dee A. Lusby
    Ph/Fax: 1-520-748-0542
    Email: deelusbybeekeeper@excelonline.com


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Post

    What's the feeling in the states regarding bees foraging on non-organic crops? I agree about zero tolerance for chemicals inside the hive, but how do people feel about the guidelines issued by Florida Organic Growers and Consumers, Inc. (in the BEE-L archive), which stipulate that the hive must not be within three miles of non-organically grown crops? They are not zero-tolerance regarding what goes into the hive, as the guidlines take no account of contamination of comb or the movement of wax within the hive, while I feel that such a strict line regarding foraging would rule large parts of the world out of organic production, and probably increase the price beyond what many could pay. There can't be many places in Britain, for instance, which could be used for commercial production, and be capable of producing organic honey along those guidelines.

    Regards,

    Robert Brenchley

    RSBrenchley@aol.com

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