Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Question

    bees are incredible,every beekeeper knows that ,efficient, industrious, organised. i've often wondered if drones play roles we don't understand,are they really allowed to just hang around all day?sometimes they are the first to fly out at you when you open the hive,could this be a noisy defensive distraction?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Post

    From what I understand, they do just hang out all day, and go for an occasional pleasure flight. What a life, but then, I guess it's not so much fun when the workers decide to kill them off come cold weather, or when they do get to mate and have to sacrifice their lives for that. I do have one hive, a rather feisty and agressive one, that did not kill off the drones this past Fall or Winter. I thought that was interesting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,610

    Post

    I do wonder if there are other things they add to the hive. I don't think they "do" anything or someone would have observed it. But they may add pheromones and such to the general feeling of health in the hive.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Dousman,Wi.U.S.A.
    Posts
    209

    Post

    I think they basically just "hang out" , hoping to get lucky!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mn, wi, tx
    Posts
    174

    Post

    If your male, your similar to a drone. Cannot feed yourself, and just hangin hoping to "get lucky".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    they don't seem to do much,doesn't that seem pretty inefficient for such a complex group of organisms,maybe they act as bulliten boards,when other bees come into contact with them,to feed them or just in passing,maybe they pass along hive information?just my musings.....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    they don't seem to do much,doesn't that seem pretty inefficient for such a complex group of organisms,maybe they act as bulliten boards,when other bees come into contact with them,to feed them or just in passing,maybe they pass along hive information?just my musings.....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Elizabethtown,KY
    Posts
    260

    Post

    Beeman,
    I'm glad YOU said that!
    Denise

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I was trying to put a drone on a string to freak some of my friends out, when I was trying to put the string on I decided to chill Mr. Drone to immobilize him, I've done it with bees and it doesn't take long, but the drone took for ever. So I was thinking maybe they fly earlier in the morning when its cooler look for queens and smell for flowers.
    I also think they might help defend the hive by making louder noises. I noticed this with some bees I have buy my house, I will walk up to the hive and four drones will start buzzing around me some would even dive bomb me and fly in to me, and moving from side to side around me.
    One more thing and I'm done, when I did get the drone on the string I ran it over to the hive, and as soon as I got it over to the hive the drone turned around and started hitting and buzzing me (it wasn't do to the string. I know some will think that.)

    Or I might be crazy B^). < most probable)
    The above is a type'o I swear!
    Joseph

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,610

    Post

    When I was a kid, we would do anything that flys on the end of a long hair. Of course you had to get one from a girl first. You can do horse flys, drones, etc. and even house flys. It was fun to freak out the girls.

    I've never tried a drone on one near the hive. I have been buzzed by drones when approching a hive. The first few times it's scary because the sound is enough different from a happy worker that you think it's an angry worker, and it turns out to be a drone. After a while you can hear the difference. I always say they sound like B52s. I guess I didn't think they were trying to chase me off. I thought it was just curiosity, but I'll have to watch closer now.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Hello everyone,
    very interesting topic,but lets give some credit to mr. Drone. He gives up his life for a moments pleasure. but have you guys ever thought that he also provides heat for the brood he sits on. Taking up space isn't all bad is it now. LOL . And Denise I can feed myself too. LOL Yours in our Hobby
    Walt

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    695

    Post

    "ever thought that he also provides heat for the brood he sits on."

    I too have thought that they may play a role in brood rearing. Just their bulk alone could act as insulator or even heat sinks.
    I've notice that drone cells are often
    at the lower and or outside edges of the frame. I thought that this may be a way for the hive to maintain temperature on those
    cooler summer nights whilst the girls are busy in the kitchen.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    brown county,indiana,usa
    Posts
    571

    Post

    alright,this is the sort of stuff i'm talking about,maybe that drone buzzing is even an audible alarm to guard bees.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Hillsboro, NH usa
    Posts
    69

    Post

    Wow! Great point. I've been freaked by drones too, till you get used to the sound. They are much less affected by smoke it seems(?), so by the sound of the attack you wonder if you have a nasty situation developing sometimes. Maybe this should be a new topic (probably addressed before so feel free to tell me to go do a search or something), but do the bees get used to a handler? I'm working "my" hives for the true owner who had to "move to the city" so they are at my place now. I have NO problems with them, but when he comes once in a while, using the same suit and equipment....well I've had to use a fly- swatter (at about 100yds from the hives) to knock a bunch of stinging bees off him to get him into the house. I've noted that IMHO, I treat them MUCH more gently handling frames then he does, but is it a function of frequency of gentle contact (getting used to ya), or actual treatment, or some combination of both that makes a difference (assuming you have mild bees to start with). Boy, am I the master of the run-on sentance! Anyway, I can usually go gloveless, where he needs body armor! Please advise as we are both interested in knowing. Thanks. Gary

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,610

    Post

    >do the bees get used to a handler?

    I don't think they get used to someone as in accepting them, but they get used to someone as in they can smell them 50 yards away and attack them.

    >I'm working "my" hives for the true owner who had to "move to the city" so they are at my place now. I have NO problems with them, but when he comes once in a while, using the same suit and equipment....well I've had to use a fly- swatter (at about 100yds from the hives) to knock a bunch of stinging bees off him to get him into the house.

    Sounds like they know him.

    >I've noted that IMHO, I treat them MUCH more gently handling frames then he does, but is it a function of frequency of gentle contact (getting used to ya), or actual treatment, or some combination of both that makes a difference (assuming you have mild bees to start with).

    This may have been the start of the difference, but I do think they get to know their "enemies".

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads