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  1. #1
    I found a huge bumblebee next in the ground at the base of a large pine tree- Seems as though they burrowed in the pine needles. I am afriad my kids will step on it and disturb them. How would I go about getting rid of them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Post

    I'm pretty sure you can't move them, would it be possible to put a fence around them until fall?

  3. #3

    Post

    Is there anything I can do to wipe them out?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    They are in a burrow. Probably an old mouse nest or ground squirrel nest. If you have a bee suit, you can flood it. Just suit up and turn on the hose and put it down the hole and leave for a while. It takes a while to flood one because they have a chamber above the bottom of the hole, but if you let it run a while it will flood it.

    If you don't have a suit, then turn on the hose, quickly put it down the hole and run like heck.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,593

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    I should say, you should go back and fill in the hole afterwards.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    798

    Wink

    What's wrong with leaving them and instead teaching the kids - "there are things that can hurt you so avoid it".

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Eagle Creek, Oregon
    Posts
    289

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    The one, and only, time that I removed a bumblebee nest I didn't even recognize it as a bee's nest. It was in an old shed that I was demolishing and I thought it was a mouse nest. The nest looked just like the cottony ball that a mouse would build. I had the nest in my hand when I felt it vibrating and I realized it was not a mouse nest. When I realized what I had in my hand I threw it down and made a hasty retreat. Even with that degree of up close abuse of their nest they did not attack me. I remained very close by and never did have any problem with the bees. When it was all done I felt guilty about destroying their nest---I've always been a sucker for bumblebees! The only time I've been stung by a bumblebee was when I accidently crushed one. Live and let live.
    George

  8. #8

    Post

    I agree and do not want to destroy them but my kids do get careless and run around the yard alot- Plus if you point it out to them- They may have a tendancy to get curious on thieor own and I'd rather not have it come to that.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,593

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    >I agree and do not want to destroy them but my kids do get careless and run around the yard alot- Plus if you point it out to them- They may have a tendancy to get curious on thieor own and I'd rather not have it come to that.

    But it's a great opportunity for them to learn that they should have listened to their parents.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Wyoming MN
    Posts
    406

    Post

    None the less, if you really want to get rid of it, Soapy water will do the trick, otherwise, Safer makes a brand of insect spray that is mint based, that is better than any of the harsh chemicals out there. Our Menards sells it for a couple bucks.
    Meanie that I am however, I would leave it and let the kids (depending on their ages) learn the hard way. Better than having them swing at a hornet's nest when I may not be there to interceed.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Porter, Ok USA
    Posts
    491

    Post

    Any insecticide sprayed down into their nest will kill them. I have used gasoline out in the pasture where it was safe to do so. One word of caution; You can anger a bumblebee.
    Ox

  12. #12

    Post

    "But it's a great opportunity for them to learn that they should have listened to their parents"

    WHAT?? So when my kid inadvertantly steps on a hive and gets swarmed possibly sending them to the hospital- I'll remember that response.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,735

    Post

    If you're intent on killing them then you've gotten all the information you need. If you're simply fearful of your children accidentally stepping on them then fence off the area. You said that itÂ’s at the base of a tree - sounds like you could put up a small decorative fence just enough to keep the kids from running over the nest. BTW, I have a VERY curious 20 month-old boy who gets into everything and he has never bothered my hives (I have 3 hives on a three acre lot, with one right behind the garage). We have repeatedly reinforced that he needs to be very careful around the beehives. Relax, just put a small barrier around the nest and everyone should peacefully coexist.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    952

    Post

    You're taking chances with your kids that I can't imagine. Bumblebees are not honeybees which have probably been selectively bred for gentleness. When I was about ten, I was stung 5 times by ONE bumblebee (they don't die after stinging). My left side puffed up like a balloon. Imagine what a swarm could do to a child. To me, this is no different than leaving a rattlesnake in your backyard with your kids just to avoid "killing a creature".

    I say gas the hole and ignite.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    We found lot's of bumble bee nests when I was a kid. I learned to listen and leave them alone. I managed, in spite of surprising a few bumble nests (I was just as surprised) to not get stung. Partly because I knew what to do. Run away quickly!

    Bumble bees are endangered here, and I suppose, everywhere.

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