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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    255

    Post

    Hi, I did my first extracting this weekend, and boy was it fun [img]smile.gif[/img] I extracted on Saturday and bottled on Sunday. I guess I should have waited another few days to let the air settle up- but, some of my bottles have a ring of bubbles on the top... will these go away in time (I have cork tops on the honey)... is this something to be concerned with? Thanks for your feedback.

    DJ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Post

    Some air is normal. It should stop after a few days. If it doesn't then you need to consider if it's fermenting.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    255

    Post

    I hope it isn't fermenting? I checked the water content and it was just under 18.0. I checked the stuff I had from the store (junk) and it was close to 20.0. Do you have to worry about fermenting when it is below 19.0?

    And when it stops, will the bubbles disappear? or just stay there on the top? (I have cork tops on them)

    Thanks, M,

    DJ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    233

    Post

    the bubbles should come out overnight i thought?

    i believe fermenting shouldn't happen until 17% or less.

    keeping the temp 52 F or over should help too if need be.
    \"You\'ve got to stop beating up your women because you can\'t find a job, because you didn\'t want to get an education and now you\'re (earning) minimum wage.\"<br /><br />-Bill Cosby

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Georgia mountains
    Posts
    923

    Post

    The laboratory point for fermenting is 18.6% moisture or higher. That does not translate exactly to real life, but it's close.

    BubbaBob

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    255

    Post

    Is there any way to reduce moisture prior to extracting? All my frames were fully capped. But it has been VERY humid around here... Maybe a dehumidifier in the kitchen?

    Thanks for your ideas!

    DJ

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Glasgow, KY
    Posts
    94

    Post

    Dr. last summer I extracted a super of fully capped and it turned out to be 20% :mad:
    Now I stack them up and put a small fan on top blowing down and put a light bulb underneath if I think it is cool enough.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    984

    Post

    I have had honey ferment at 18.2%. I try not to extract until mositure is at 17.5 or below. IT DOESNT MATTER IF ITS CAPPED OR NOT!!!!!!!! It matters where you live. In the midwest ie montana, ND, SD, AZ&lt; CA even FL in spring the humidity is low and honey from orange will be at 17 or less 1/2 capped!! I have had SUPERS of FULLY CAPPED honey fermnented in comb. It will have bubbles in it in the comb and "pop" when you uncap it. SO I try to remove my honey especially late summer when humidity increases or a wet year just as the bees begin to cap it. It is hard to dry capped honey lot slower But if it is uncapped I can bring moisture down from say 21% to 17% in three days using dehumidifier. You can make a stand where supers of honey sit and let the dehumidifier blow air up through them or make a pallet with a fan blowing air up through the stack to dry the honey with a dehumidifier running perferably in a small room so as to get the moisture as low as possiable in room. A good way to tell if honey is thick enough if you cant afford a refractometer is if it is room temp and you let it run a bucket or jar does it stack up and level out or does the stream go down into the honey in the container like water? If it stacks up at 75-86degrees it is ok. Rick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    255

    Post

    Hi Rick,

    It stacked up at 88 degrees (in my kitchen) [img]smile.gif[/img] The refractometer said 18.2, though...I think it is ok- but, just was curious about the bubbles. They actually are starting to disappear now in most of the bottles. I think when I extract later this year I am going to use dehumidfier just to help... even if it is just a little [img]smile.gif[/img] Thanks everyone's help [img]smile.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lancaster, Ky. / Frostproof Fl.
    Posts
    984

    Post

    did you adjust the refractometer reading for the high room temp....sounds like you should be ok. If you let it settle aout 3 days it will eliminate most bubbles. Rick

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