Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I was looking at my hive yesterday and noticed that bees were crawling through a crack in-between two bricks I am using for a hive stand. So I pulled the brick out and saw a small cluster of bees underneath. Now, there is a small crack in the bottom board in the front entrance maybe it follows through the entier boar and the bees are trying to glue it up? or are they hiding from the heat?
    Has any one else seen this? Oh, and I don't have an open mesh floor.

    Joseph Tona
    Any one with AOL, or AOL instant messenger can instant message any time they want at jtjrson. I want to create a beekeepers list on my buddy list.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    397

    Post

    Joseph

    You wrote:
    I was looking at my hive yesterday and noticed that bees were crawling through a crack in-between two bricks I am using for a hive stand. So I pulled the brick out and saw a small cluster of bees underneath. Now, there is a small crack in the bottom board in the front entrance maybe it follows through the entier boar and the bees are trying to glue it up? or are they hiding from the heat?
    Has any one else seen this? Oh, and I don't have an open mesh floor.

    Reply:
    Yes, this has been seen for decades in the deserts/warm climate of the Southwestern states.

    Sometimes the bees come in from the heat and it is cool there to cluster until a better home can be located.

    Other times the beekeeper in working his bees accidently runs the queen out of a super while putting them back together and she cannot find her way back in and ends up under the colony with a small force, while they raise a new one.

    In either case, you end up with a small swarm the size of a grapefruit to one the size of a football that can be used to replace a queen you have lost or if found soon enough be put back into the colony.

    Also too, it could be bees handling through a crack in a bottom board, but it takes a pretty big crack to do that!

    Let the list here know what you finally find out!

    Regards,

    Dee A. Lusby

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I'm pretty sure its from the heat, but the hive on a brick stand and the bees have to crawl through cracks to get underneath the hive thats. I am certain that the queen is not there because no comb has been built underneath and I haven't checked the brood super since the beginning of May and the cluster started at the end of May on a hot week.
    Thanks for the information you gave me ! Now I will be sure not to run out the queen!

    Joseph Tona

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,269

    Post

    It isnt unusual for bees to hang out in hot weather especially at night.We have some old bottom boards that were poorly made,with half inch gaps between the boards from shrinkage.The bees seem to like them and make no effort to propolise the gaps.On a hot summer night some will camp out under the hive to stay cool.
    Since we clip our queens,another situation arises when a hive swarms.Sometimes the old queen will crawl under the hive and set up shop.This is always a surprise when the hive is picked up to be moved.
    ----Mike

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads