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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Seattle, Washington State
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    I will be moving my bees for the last time (i hope) in October to a place where it can flood up to about 3 or 4 feet. My plan is to place 6 centerblocks down lendthwise in 2 rows of 3 and place the same set up in the middle and on the other end and run two boards down the middle and place the hives on top.

    any suggestions?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
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    1,347

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    Do not go there. IMHO it's not worth the risk, hassle, anguish, assuming there is no damage. On the other hand if it does flood and you lose your hives, you'll be asking yourself "What was I thinking?"

    Try finding a better place. Best of luck.

    Jean-Marc

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,341

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    And use a ladder to put the supers on? And when the four foot (48") of water comes through and gets taller than the 24" (three rows) of cinder blocks then what?

    What does "can flood" mean exactly? It floods most every spring? It flooded once in 1883? It flooded once ten years ago? It floods anytime there is a dowpour?

    Can you put them on a hill instead of the valley?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
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    1,848

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    I think that if you must put them there you had better build a raft or barge to insure they survive. Isn't there any other possibilities for a bee site?
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    napoleon ohio
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    769

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    Farther up the hill would be much better not just the flood and haveing to use a ladder will be bad.The moisture that will be in the low spot will be enought to make use nuts fighting chalk brood.
    Mitch KD8IMF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    the area that it is on, Carnation, WA., is a farm town and it does flood. The water rises and than receeds. There is not current that will sift the hives away. This is the best spot I have found that has commadations.

    I am talking with the owner today. He mentioned that the water comes up to about knees height....so two to four inches.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,341

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    Maybe you should plant four posts in the ground and build a platform to put them on? You could put the platform four feet off the ground.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

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    "the water comes up to about knees height....so two to four inches"

    Just how tall are you?

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

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    Why are you putting your hives in a flood plain? DonÂ’t you have a better location to winter your hives? Seems like the damp would be an invitation for problems.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

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    "Maybe you should plant four posts in the ground and build a platform to put them on? You could put the platform four feet off the ground."

    Consider making the platform big enough so you can work while standing on it. Then you won't be reaching up a thousand feet to reach the supers.

    Or were you planning on putting the hives back to a more ground level height after the flooding season is passed? I would worry about off season flooding in that case.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

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    Consider building an yourself an Ark. Make it 40 cubits by 30 cubits...

    Seriously Chef, I'd like to hear why you feel you need to put your hives at risk like this. It sounds like you couldn't pick a worse place if you tried. What are the circumstances?

    George-
    Dulcius ex asperis

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,398

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    Not to be rude, but you guys do not understand. I have been looking for two months for a place to put my bees. I have gottan rejected a lot and I finally found two farmers who would let me put my bees on their land. The drawback... it floods in the low lands.

    I talked with the owner today and we reviewed some old pictures he took and we found a place that the flood waters do not get to. I am still going to put the bees on the block.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,361

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    As a rule, low lying areas are prone to moisture and cold air drainage, bothe detrimental to bees. Not to rain a flood on your parade (or your hives) Chef but I'd keep looking. Call the cooperative extension or Farm Bureau.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,341

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    >I talked with the owner today and we reviewed some old pictures he took and we found a place that the flood waters do not get to. I am still going to put the bees on the block.

    That sounds more promising, at least.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Squamish BC
    Posts
    30

    Post

    I use skids (pallets) to keep them off the ground.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Northren MN
    Posts
    57

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    I'd find a diffrent spot unless it is worth the honey produced then I would use pallets so they would possibly float and stay upright. Works good unless 1 hives weighs 300lbs and the other weighs 100lbs.Then they fall over and sometimes not float. pallet work best for doubles with no singles use the blocks to tie pallets to.Got pics of floater when flood of 78 hit mn will post here if I can find them.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    133

    Post

    I am curious as to why you are moving bees in October as opposed to waiting until early spring to put them on this land? At any rate, don't make a decision in haste you might regret. If I thought there was a chance of flooding, I wouldn't put my bees there.

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