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Thread: Strange

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Fultondale,Al,USA
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    42

    Post

    I am new so I may be alarmed early.It has been warm so I checked my lower brood camber on a hive. No laying going on. Is this normal?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,895

    Post

    You said that the lower brood chamber did not have any brood.
    Is there more than one chamber?
    Did you see where the queen is?
    Is there any brood in the upper brood box?

    The strain of bees plays a major role in the build up in spring and when it takes place.

    Carnolians and Russians tend not to really start laying for spring build up until the conditions are right. Namely nector and pollen coming in.

    Italians tend to build up early before either Carnolians or Russians.

    If you have other hives of the same strain,check them and see their status.

    Also, check for pollen and honey stores, both of these will effect the start of spring build up.

    As to whether you may have a problem or not, someone in the same area would be able to give you a better idea as to what the status should be.

    [This message has been edited by MountainCamp (edited January 16, 2004).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,213

    Post

    Someone from Alabama might give you a more applicable answer. Around here I would not be surprised to either find brood or not in January. I would expect a little in February and a lot of brood in April. But that is here. I would guess in Alabama you would have some this time of year, but I don't think I'd panic until you don't see any in April.

    As mentioned, if the weather is nice enough, you need to search for the queen and see if you can find her. It will be very reassuring if you do.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Fultondale,Al,USA
    Posts
    42

    Post

    True, I did not pull all of the frames in the middle. At least I can work my bees not negitive 40 deg tems and snow so far.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Of course if the bees are not flying you shouldn't be opening it at all. If the bees are still pretty tightly clustered, it's a good sign it's too cold to be breaking into the brood nest. You might chill the brood. If it's a nice warm day and the bees aren't all clustered up tightly, then somewhere in the middle of the most bees is where you'll find the brood, if there is any.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama
    Posts
    536

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    bamabee,

    Where in AL are you? I'm in Mobile and my bees have brood year round - I am betting you should have brood by now. My brood nests are expanding into the next box with a fair amount of fresh pollen at the leading edge of the nest.

    ------------------
    Rob Koss

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Fultondale,Al,USA
    Posts
    42

    Question

    In birmingham, I have two supers on the hive. I suspect they are up in the top super. Hives look strong pleny of stores. Will be ordering new queens this month due to queens being 2 years old. Can you chang a hive that was italians to Russian without package bees? Will the italian accept russian queen?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    mountain home, ar, usa
    Posts
    378

    Post

    Yes you can change italians to russians, but I've heard it might take a day or two longer to gain queen acceptance. I went all russian from buckfast and acceptance took anywhere from 3 to 7 days. A long-time beekpeeper once told me he smears the old queen onto the cage with the new queen in it, and the bees will accept the new queen faster this way he says. I've never tried that, but it makes sense (pheremones).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,213

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    I've installed Russians in hives that were buckfast also. Don't know that I remember if I installed them in Italian hives, but I'm pretty sure I did. I don't remember any significant problems. If you have a little doubt about the process then don't pull the cork or put a hole in the candy until you are pretty sure they are trying to feed her, not attack her. Then put the hole in the candy. The next most sure way is to put her in a push in cage and let her start laying first (Betterbee sells and most bee books tell how to make one from hardware cloth). The sure fire method is to take a frame of brood and the new queen and start a little nuc until they have accepted her then you can do a newspaper combine. I've never had the nuc/combine method fail.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    770

    Big Grin

    Last spring I saw a presentation of some research a beekeeper did about different ways of introducing new queens and the acceptance rates and times. Bottomline: remove ALL of the attendants from the queen cage. He had nearly 100% acceptance after 2 days. Apparently, the workers around the queen cage are forced (by instinct) to feed the queen. I tried his method last summer on 3 queen intros and had 100% acceptance. BUT, I did almost lose one queen that escaped while removing the attendants - she flew away! I was kicking myself until a few minutes later I noticed a small glob of bees on a nearby bush - it was the escaped queen and her attendants.

  11. #11
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    bamabee,

    I'm east of Atlanta, and have brood rearing going on throughout the year as long as the hive is strong. A weaker one may stop for a few months during the winter. If they have plenty of stores, you should be ok. Remember that the brood patterns will be much smaller than spring and summer patterns. I have seen some no bigger than a quarter in size.

    BB

  12. #12
    BILLY BOB Guest

    Post

    bamabee,

    I'm east of Atlanta, and have brood rearing going on throughout the year as long as the hive is strong. A weaker one may stop for a few months during the winter. If they have plenty of stores, you should be ok. Remember that the brood patterns will be much smaller than spring and summer patterns. I have seen some no bigger than a quarter in size.

    BB

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,213

    Post

    I had quit trying to get the attendants out because it's so much work. But if that's what you want to do, here's how to do it. Get a hairclip queen catcher. Go in a small closed room with one window (a bathroom usually works). I often use a box with a screened bottom on it and use it on the floor on on a tv tray with my hands under the box to work. You can open the cage and try to get the attendants and the queen out. When they fly out they will usually try to fly up to the screen. If you get the attendants out without the queen, great. If not then catch the queen and put her back in the cage. If she gets out of the box she will fly to the window. Catch her on the window and put her back in the cage. There is a glass device at www.beeworks.com that is useful for putting her back in the cage. You can get her in the bottom and gently puff with your breath to put her in the cage. If you're doing all of this anyway, you may as well mark her and if you're inclined, clip her.

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