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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main...whornets21.xml

    http://www.physorg.com/news91263719.html

    Don't know if these are Japanese hornets, or as deadly as the article says, but still interesting and somewhat scary.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Braunfels, TX
    Posts
    463

    Post

    This is the same wasp that made the video rounds on this site and Animal Kingdom. I was not aware that it was in China, but the video, I believe, cited its habitat as possibly Hokaido, a northern Japanese Island. The articles above indicate that it acclimates to French/European climates due to global warming. The video and other articles indicate that it is well suited to very cold climates and hibernates in winter. I don't think global warming has anything do do with it. This is, indeed, frightening. I can see another AHB variant on its way to the US. Crap, just when I was getting an handle on varroa and AHB, now this.
    Hobbyist

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    288

    Post

    it said "smaller than the European hornet" while the giant things from Japan they show on Animal Planet are the largest hornets. These may be a problem, but they aren't the giant ones.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    288

    Post

    hmmm, maybe not--the second article refers to it as the biggest, and looking up "vespa velutina" it comes back as the giant Japanese one......

    Good times; I disliked yellowjackets....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Braunfels, TX
    Posts
    463

    Post

    The cited article specifically mentions Vespa velutina. This is the wasp mentioned in the National Geographic video. From Wikipedia, "[T]the Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia, known colloquially as the Yak Killer hornet), the world's largest wasp, is a native of temperate and tropical Eastern Asia. Its body length is between 27 mm (1.1 inches) and 45 mm (1.8 inches), with a wingspan of about 76 mm (3 inches). Queens may reach a length of 55 mm (2.2 inches)." It appears that both wasps are found in China. The former is in Japan. Both target honey bees. Either way, we are in deep !@#$.
    Hobbyist

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    793

    Post

    And how do we tell the difference between a European hornet and an Asian one?
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    > And how do we tell the difference between a
    > European hornet and an Asian one?

    Find a flagpole, and compare the flag with your
    World Atlas to determine which country you are
    in, and hence, which continent?

    Maybe I need to draw myself a diagram:
    </font><blockquote>code:</font><hr /><pre style="font-size:x-small; font-family: monospace;">Basic Concept ----&gt;


    ???
    O
    -+-
    | &lt;- Me
    / \</pre>[/QUOTE]

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