Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Charlotte NC USA
    Posts
    3

    Post

    Does anyone have a standard contract they use with customers when removing bees from their homes??

  2. #2
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    I do. It is pretty simple. I have used it only when I felt necessary. E-mail me and I will send you a copy.
    jason.groppel@cmcss.net

  3. #3
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    BeeAttitude Bee Extraction Services

    Owner: Jason Groppel - Apiculturalist


    Service Agreement

    I, ___________________________, release Jason Groppel from any liability pertaining to any
    (print name)

    damages caused by the honeybees or the extraction process. I give permission to Mr.


    Groppel to take whatever action necessary to remove the bees and honeycomb.


    I acknowledge that while utmost care will be taken to avoid damages, it may be


    necessary to obtain outside services at the owner’s expense to repair any resulting


    damages.


    Any work to repair the damages related to the extraction process are not the


    responsibility of Mr. Groppel / BeeAttitude Bee Extraction Services.


    Mr. Groppel has the right, at any time, to temporarily or permanently discontinue


    the extraction if any unforeseen obstacles, complications or health hazards arise


    during the extraction process.

    Signature ____________________________________ Date _________________


  4. #4
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Some of you were having difficulty with the attachment so there is the copy and paste.
    I am also including an informational sheet here that I am going to use this year for swarm calls. Notice the part about donations!

    Honey bees are an invaluable and often unappreciated part of our lives. Without them we would have no almond bars nor apple pies, no watermelons, orange juice, nor cotton pajamas to name a only a few. Bees pollinate flowers and plants to produce the fruits, vegetables, and other crops we depend upon. Our economy benefits from them to the tune nearly 14 billion dollars per year. For this reason, I remind everyone that honey bees are normally gentle and non-aggressive as long as they or their homes are not disturbed nor given cause for alarm.

    In late March and throughout the months of April, May, June and as late as August honey bees have a means of dividing their numbers and set off to establish a new colony. This method is called swarming. Often, people have been known to see bees massing in large numbers on low hanging tree limbs, bushes and on building walls.

    As they travel in search of a new home, they rest in what often looks like a “honeybee-beard”. They land upon bicycles, trees, picnic tables, sides of houses and barns et cetera.
    As these helpful creatures travel, please do not attempt to destroy or harm them. They can be safely removed by local beekeepers that have special tools and suits. They are also familiar with the bees’ ways and will be able to find a better home for them than the backyard or playground.

    If you see a large number of bees and wish to have them removed please contact me or another local beekeeper that will handle them with care in order to find a new home for them. *Local pest control companies must follow federal and state laws regulating pesticides’ uses and often will not spray honey bees (apis mellifera), which are endangered. Besides capturing swarms I also remove bees from inside houses’ walls and other structures with a special vacuum, which captures them alive.

    If you have appreciated my services I do accept donations to cover the cost of gas and my time for capturing swarms. THANK YOU FOR NOT SPRAYING THE BEES!

    Please call Jason Groppel at (931)358-4003 to have a swarm /colony of honey bees removed from a yard, building or tree or if you have questions concerning honey or honey bees.

    THANKS,
    Jason L. Groppel - Apiculturalist


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Collierville, TN
    Posts
    1

    Post

    Help! I have just had a swarm of honey bees tunnel into a corner of my siding and make a nest. I have loasds of dead bees on the ground from the original swarm and the bees fly in and out of this corner all day. I have a five year old very allergic to bee stings and I am afraid of honey in my walls, the inside wall is my dining room. How do I remove these. Do I call someone? Know anyone in Memohis? I am quite paniced by this. The terminex guy says he cant do anything. What do I do?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Salem, NY
    Posts
    350

    Post

    beworried, i can't help you here, but i would suggest posting an individual thread whose title would catch the eye of a beekeeping near memphis. do this at this site and also at http://www.beemaster.com/beebbs/ they also have a beekeeping forum. good luck to you!

    i'm sure some beekeeper would be glad to have your bees!

    justgojumpit

    [This message has been edited by justgojumpit (edited April 19, 2004).]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,386

    Post

    >Help! I have just had a swarm of honey bees tunnel into a corner of my siding and make a nest.

    Sorry, but bees don't tunnle. They don't have the mandibles (jaws) for it. But if they find a hole 1/4" in diameter they can get into the wall.

    >I have loasds of dead bees on the ground from the original swarm and the bees fly in and out of this corner all day.

    Original swarm? Not this one? I'm confused now.

    >I have a five year old very allergic to bee stings and I am afraid of honey in my walls,

    I would be afraid of honey in the walls too. It won't take them long to put a lot of it away in there.

    >the inside wall is my dining room. How do I remove these. Do I call someone? Know anyone in Memohis? I am quite paniced by this. The terminex guy says he cant do anything. What do I do?

    You have a few choices. For one, how long have they been there? The shorter the time the less likely they have stored alot of honey in there.

    You can by Apicide form Brusy Mt. Bee Farm it will kill bees. But then you still have honey in the wall and any bees who try to get that honey will get poisened by the Apicide and so the honey will remain and the combs will melt on a hot day and make a mess.

    You can find a beekeeper who is willing to remove them. But that may require removing a lot of your siding. This is a major carpentry job and usually the beekeeper is not a carpenter, so they remove the siding and the bees and after there are no bees you get a contractor to come and fill the cavity with some foam or something so another swarm of bees won't come there and replace the siding.

    If you can find a beekeeper who wants to do a "cone" removal and you are willing to be patient and have a lot of disoriented bees flying around for a few days, they can put a one way "trap" on the entrance that lets the bees out but won't let them in. Usually a hive is set outside for them to move into. After most of them have moved out, usually the beekeeper takes these away, so they won't move back in and then brings a strong hive to rob out the honey in the wall. A little honey on the entrance to bait it and the strong hive steals all the honey in the wall. Then you use "great stuff" or some other foam and fill the hole and hopefully the cavity in the wall so bees won't move back in.

    Good luck.

  8. #8
    Jason G in Tennessee Guest

    Post

    Did you ever find anyone to do the beehive removal for you?
    I wish I were closer so I could help you remove the bees from your house. It would take about 3-4 hours, but you could be done with them once and for all. Spraying them is definitely not an option. The cone method is nice, but takes a month or two to complete usually.
    Jason Groppel in Clarksville, Tennessee

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads