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  1. #1

    Post

    Does anyone store honey supers outside over winter? My garage is a bit full, but I worry about mice and mold if I store them outside. The climate here is quite wet and warm over winter (PNW)

  2. #2

    Post

    Sounds like its time for you to buy a honey shed. I am using one of those Handy House Aluminum buildings about 8X10 with a window in it. A few shelves installed along each side. Most of my stuff stacks in there nicely. Weather tight. Single light bulb and one outlet. I started trying out one of the Drip trays that Brushy Mountain sells. Like them real well. Stack the old supers with extracted frames on them and it keeps everything nice and tight and clean. Use a old Migratory top to seal everything up. I think I am going to get a couple more of these drip trays. they work real well. For moving the Supers out to the hives and returning them and storing them.

    Another plus to this Shed is it makes a nice extraction area for my little crush and strain operation. I can set a work bench in the middle and a shop stool and put some paper down and work my frames into my double bucket strainer real quickly and toss em into a tote (the drainings from that tote get fed back to the bees as I set the tote out near the hive on its side so they don't drown and can clean it up). And I leave the window open this time a year with the screen in and it keeps the bees out but lets the air circulate. It stays nice and hot and dry in there. So the honey flows well. Just have to keep from dripping sweat in the honey!

    But a shed dedicated to mostly bee equipment is the way to go. Mine has some other stuff on the shelves too as I don't need it all yet....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    >The climate here is quite wet and warm over winter (PNW)

    How wet and warm? Do you get a hard freeze now and then?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4

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    most years we get a hard freeze - but only for about a week or so, mostly rain and just above the freezing mark. The weather is comparable to Seattle weather.

  5. #5

    Post

    most years we get a hard freeze - but only for about a week or so, mostly rain and just above the freezing mark. The weather is comparable to Seattle weather.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Post

    I'd do something for the wax moths if it doesn't freeze often.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Post

    You need to mouse proof them as well as possible. They love empty supers to make a nice mess of things.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    Lesser Wax Moth (Achroia grisella) adult is silver-gray to buff-colored, about 3/16 to 1/2” long w/ a wingspread of about 13/16". Wings overlap slightly at tip when at rest. Cocoons are about 1/2" long and are generally densely covered w/ frass (insect excrement or debris) [Ref 13, p385]. Its head is conspicuously orange-yellow, and is common in parts of Pacific Northwest [Ref 2, p202].

    “OFF-SEASON” COMB PROTECTION - When frames of comb are removed from the hive and placed in storage, there is increased danger of damage by greater wax moth. Steps must be taken to kill existing stages of the moth and guard against later infestation [Ref 14, p169].

    1) SUMMER - Stack supers so light and air get to both sides of all frames, some stack on their sides, some offset them in stacks, some put on racks so light gets inside. Keep out of rain [BC 7/06, p8].
    2) FALL - Stack on strong colonies to let bees keep them clean [BC 7/06, p8].
    3) WINTER - Use PDB or freeze frames for a week to kill all forms, after frost, keep in an unheated location [BC 7/06, p8].

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Auburn, Wa
    Posts
    134

    Post

    I'm in Seattle area, you better make sure those supers are completly empty and dry before storing them. I personally dont put mine outside cuz they get full of earwigs.......every cell gets earwigs laying eggs in them.....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Spraying the frames with Bta like Certan
    or B401 is a good idea. This biological
    control is very effective on the larva
    of the wax moth. Inexpensive insurance.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Parkton, North Carolina
    Posts
    253

    Post

    Yeah, except you can't buy it right now. I need some. Theresa.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    Check the for sale area I have the same
    species of Bt in powdered form to mix
    yourself at way less than Certan. I am
    hesitant to bring it up in this forum
    but I had to buy 30 pounds as a minimum
    order..... yikes!

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