Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31

Thread: Black Queen

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    tecumsesh, it really is a standard. It doesn't change. It's just

    Color Last Digit Of Year
    ------ ------------------
    White 1 or 6
    Yellow 2 or 7
    Red 3 or 8
    Green 4 or 9
    Blue 5 or 0

    Some people even memorize it. I don't see why you have a problem with it.

    Joel if you re-read what you're agreeing with Dick was saying that that's with old information when the paint had lead in it.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Thanks Hawk, I did understand the post but read it again to make sure. I wasn't agreeing with Dick just stating that I had read the same information.( and that Kelly book is really old) I don't have any reason to conclude that lead was the cause, nor did he,(just that it could be). If what is stated is true, there may be other reasons such as the mentioned increased efforts by hygenic bees to remove a foreign substance. I will have to say it would be nice as I age to have marked queens as my previously perfect eyesight now requires bi-focals which are too often fogged or sweated on when I'm working hives.
    By the way, what altitude are your hives?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    We're at 6200 ft. Bout the same as you, right. lol

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Post

    Joel sezs:
    I've read the same info on supercedure as Dick. We don't mark or buy marked queens although for some it is useful. Most of our queens never see the 3rd year, some don't see the 2nd just due to the way we manage.
    tecumseh replies:
    Just about the same here and given the way we drive the bees all year long is it really any wonder that the queens life is significantly shortened?
    Joel then sezs:
    Tecumseh, my buckfast are killing me this year, I can't put honey supers on fast enough. They are outperforming the cordovans by a considerable amount. I heard they(Weaver) had a pretty difficult time this year with the mating nucs, let me know if you happen to hear anything about how they are doing.
    tecumseh replies:
    My All Stars are doing pretty good also, althought I cannot get them early enough to make much of a honey crop. This is really no big deal since their intended purpose is to add a continuous dribble of (hopefully improved) genetic material into my existing apiary. As to the spring nuc question... everyone had extraordinary problems this spring because the weather was so fickle. Early on lots of rain with very few days of sunshine. When the rain finally started to clear we had nights that were way too chilly and the cool nights continued right on up until mid may. I know the catch from my handful of baby nucs here was just terrible, luckly I only keep these for my own use so no one is out when thing don't work out. Hopefully I will have the opportunity to swing down by BWeaver in the next week or so and I will drop you a short report when the time comes.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Post

    Now just suppose the person putting the color on the queens is color blind--good luck.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Post

    Hawk, having been a transplant in Colorado for several years, I still have to shake my head and walk away when people talk about "mountains" in this area. We have an Adirondacks 46ers club(great bunch of people) who run around bragging about climbing the higest peaks here. I can still clearly remember huffing above tree level trying to reach 12, 13 and 14,00 feet (once). I remember 1 climb where we hiked most of the morning to reach the base (can't think of the peak right now, climbed to a point where you had to cross a ledge (18 inches wide) to get to the peak. It was a 1000 ft down if you fell.(amazing what you'll do when you're 20) Of course the natives don't tell us flatlanders about those things, they just take it for granted. We have to rent a small airplane to get anywhere near 6200 feet. We are in some beautiful country here just the same.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,525

    Post

    Is that NY or SC? I was raised in Los Angeles. Used to go to summer camp to see beauty like my back yard now. And since I left LA, I haven't been knifed or shot at once.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,335

    Post

    When I lived in Laramie one of my kids teachers went to climb some mountains in the Adirondacks. It was a tour and when the got to the peak the guide said "Most of you have probably never been this high. We are at 4000 feet above sea level." The teacher laughed and the guide asked why he was laughing. The teacher said "I live down in the valley in the rockies in Laramie, WY at 7200 feet.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    Michael, you're going to have to clarify your post. You make it sound as though the Adirondacks are in Wyoming. I grew up in New York in the foothills of the Adirondacks. In the early '70's I lived for about 18 months in Cheyenne, just down the road from Laramie.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,335

    Post

    >Michael, you're going to have to clarify your post. You make it sound as though the Adirondacks are in Wyoming.

    That's certianly not what I meant. The teacher was on vacation (from WY), back East, in the Adirondacks. He lived in Laramie. The point was that the people back East thought that 4000 feet was really high.

    In Laramie we laughed at the "Mile high city" of Denver. We had to go down 2000 feet to get there. The potatoe chip bags in Larame look like mylar balloons and you definitely regresteed opening a two litre bottle of pop any faster than a snails pace.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    88

    Post

    I'd much rather have the queens marked. Pulling out a frame of bees, with the bees about 3 deep, it's almost impossible to find the queen. Someone I read about marks his superseded queens with a gray paint. Though a novice myself, the different colors for different years really helps. I've heard of few to no problems with workers and a painted queen.
    What are we, men or Beekeepers?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads