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Thread: Bad Bees

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    97

    Question

    Well' there not bad bees at all, just a little uncooperative for my wants. I have one hive That is consistently moving capped and uncapped honey from the top supers to the botom brood chambers, and starting to become honey bound.

    This hive has four mediums as brood chambers, queen excluder and two honey supers. Bees are very gentle and great producers.

    This is my third check in the last month and a half. the first time they had almost a complete super capped. The second check revealed less capped honey, with more in the brood chambers capped on all of the top corners. Today the honey supers were completely empty and the brood chambers were extremely congested. I swithced empty drawn frames with capped honey frames from the bottom (three completely capped honey frames from the bottom brood chamber)

    Anyone else experience this? Solutions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    393

    Post

    I often experience something similar......this time of year when there is little nectar coming in some types of bees will have to consume the honey above the excluder if they are intent on brood rearing. However, I would say it has typically been limited to the first super and maybe some of the 2nd super.

    I have noticed the combination that you see...no honey left in the super but honey near the brood.....with my Buckfast/Italian hybrids but that may not always be the case for others. Just my thoughts.....Italians seem to keep the brood nest clear but eat the honey above. Bees that regulate to the enviroment more closely tend to keep the brood nest full of more honey but they also restrict brood production and are less likely to eat up the stores above the excluder.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    Apparently the bees think they need honey there to feed the brood. How much honey is still in the brood chamber? Are you replacing it with drawn comb? Are you putting the drawn comb in the middle of the brood nest where the queen would want to lay in it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    97

    Post

    Here is what I'm doing:

    I'm taking the outer frames in the brood chamber that are capped honey and moving those to the honey supers above the excluder. Once those frames are out of the way usually 3-4 I'm moving the remaining brood frames to both outer edges, and replacing the 3-4 frames with empty drawn comb in the center.

    I don't think it's a matter of needing the honey for the brood, I would put a conservative estimate of 75 lbs of honey in the hive.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Post

    When feeding brood, they want to take the honey and turn around and feed it. They rearrange stores to minimize work. Once the queen starts laying on a frame they often move the honey out of her way as she lays. Again, being frugal on work, they will usually only move it a little ways.

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