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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marion, North Carolina
    Posts
    423

    Post

    I checked one of my hives yesterday and I seem to have lost a queen. I had just requeened about a month ago. She is nowhere in the hive and the bees are still here, so I am going to order a new queen today. Anyone like to put their two cents in on what they feel is the best all around bee. The Queen I lost was a carnolian. I have italians and was considering a buckfast or some type hybrid.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,331

    Post

    I've never had a Carnolian or a Caucasian but I've heard they are both quite nice and the Caucasians seem to be weathering the mites and diseases well. They also propolize a lot, and maybe that's a good thing but it is a bit of a pain. Another I'd like to try is northern raised Italian queens from the Beeworks. Unfortunately when I've wanted some they were out. Here's what I've had and what I think:

    Buckfast from B Weaver.
    Pros: They are quite gentle (at least the first year) I have lost some to varroa, they are said to be tracheal mite resistant. I never had problems that I know of with tracheal mites. They are very productive. I've had awesome honey crops from them. They build up fast in the spring.
    Cons: Expensive. The only other down side I've had I never had until recently. I don't know if it was a weather realted phenomonae or a Buckfast trait. They swarmed a lot this year and got vicious. They had all of the qualities described as belonging to Africanized bees. They would attack me before I even opened the hive and they would pour out of the hive intent on stinging me when I did open it. One hive this was because it was queenless. I don't know what the cause was in the other, but I've requeened and they are fine now. I'm in Nebraska and didn't expect to have any crossbreeding with Africanized bees, but I have been rasing bees for almost 30 years and never seen anything like it. This was in two of my hives.

    Starline from Dadant (hybrid Italian).
    Pros: They were gentle and very productive.
    Cons: Expensive (haven't priced them lately but they were then) Subsequent self rasied queens were not terrible, but were below average production.

    Italian from Walter T. Kelly:
    Pros: Inexpensive. Gentle and productive. No problems with self raised queens. They were also gentle and productive.
    Cons: None

    All American from B Weaver.
    Pros: Gentle and productive. No problems with self raised queens. They were also gentle and productive.
    Cons: Expensive

    Russian from Walter T. Kelly:
    Inexpensive (as mite resistant bees go)Can't say what I think in the long run. I just got one established in an observation hive and another in a nuc box. So far they seem gentle and the queens are laying up a storm. I've had one of them for about a month and a half. They are supposedly mite resistant. I have observed them grooming the mites off of each other, but I'm not sure how successful they were.

    Harbo (BeeSMaRt?) from B Weaver.
    Again, I just got her. She calmed down my vicious bees and I hope will add some mite resistance, but it's too early to tell.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marion, North Carolina
    Posts
    423

    Post

    Thanks for the insight. I guess I will go with the Italian.

    The buckfast or others I may try in the spring with several of my other hives. Going into winter I just need to think about getting enough feed into the queenless hive and get her in there to keep everything in order. I ordered the queen and she will be shipped monday with a tuesday delivery by UPS. Wish me luck because I have a lot of work or should I say one hive has a lot of work todo between now and cold weather.

    I have heard that the second year with Buckfast can be interesting with temperment.

    The only other thing I can think to add is that the Kona Queen website and what I have heard from local beekeepers is that queens from Hawaii are awesome, just have not got the nerver to try one. I did call and they cannot get overnight delivery. They stated that it would take a day for the bee to get from their location to the Big Island and then another day from there to the main land and then yet another day from there to North Carolina. So I have tried to weight the cost of waiting verses finding a supplier closer to home. Time is not on my side of this equation.

    Thanks for advice. I value peoples comments who have a vast experience with the beekeeping art. After reading your post you seem to fit the ticket.

    Again thanks,
    thesurveyor

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    185

    Post

    Hi,
    my first year back with bees and i bought a 3 lb package bees from koehnen and sons in california, I have done alot of research and bought the Cordovans bees which are italian in nature . one of the most beautiful bees i ever saw . Very gentle and next week here in ohio will be pulling my last deep super off of them. They produced nearly 200 lbs of honey . Really nice bees and great people to buy from . alittle expensive because of shipping but this coming spring will do it again. I live in a city and need bees that are people friendly and these are the ones. its a pleasure to watch them. the Cordovans are bees bred from Joe Latshaw in Columbus Ohio, (Ohio Queen Breeders Assoc.) Very nice man . A+ to Koehnen's , Joe Latshaw , and to the Cordovan strain
    Walt
    Brunswick, Ohio

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marion, North Carolina
    Posts
    423

    Post

    I also bought a package of bees from CF Koehnen and sons. I must agree with you they are the neatest looking bees I have ever owned. They are real lightly colored and their temperment is outstanding. They did produce a honey crop, and that is with a dearth of nectar, due to such dry summer.

    I will probably purchase two more packages in the spring. I would not mind having all my hives bee from there stock.

    Thesurveyor

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Neodesha, Ks
    Posts
    618

    Post

    Just wondering if anyone has any opinions of the Golden Queens that Wooten's sell from Palo Cedro, Ca. Dale

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California- bay area
    Posts
    188

    Post

    I got a beehive from the Wootens. The hive they I got had a brand new queen that has been doing great, they didn't produce a lot of honey, but we are in our second year of drought. The hive does use a lot of propulis that's the only con I can find.
    They are really gentle.

    Joseph

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Marion, North Carolina
    Posts
    423

    Post

    Just wondering if anyone has ever seen what is described in The Book of the Hive and the Honey bee, as the egyptian honey bee. It described as being almost white. The book states that they were introduced to North America, but I have not found anyone that has a knowledge of the bee.

    Thanks
    Thesurveyor

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    crown point, NY, USA
    Posts
    971

    Post

    Hi,

    Just wondering if anyone has ever seen what is described in The Book of the Hive and the Honey bee, as the egyptian honey bee. It described as being almost white. The book states that they were introduced to North America, but I have not found anyone that has a knowledge of the bee.

    reply:

    Never been to Egypt to see the bees. I think I have the info you are looking for. The egytian bee was imported into the US in 1866. At that time it was known as Apis fasciata. Now it is called A.m. lamarckii. It is the smallest honeybee subspecies. It is a very lovely bee being orange in coloration and having a white pubescence. It was only imported for a few years then interest in the bee was lost. The bees maintain small colonies, are runny on the combs, swarm readily and can be aggressive (egypt is part of africa, AHB, hmmmm.....)(( Doesn't that mean african bees have been here since 1866???)). Ok enough of that! The bees have never been selected and were never given a good chance to be honest. Schiff and Sheppard report (1994) that there is still some genetic markers in the US feral bee populations.

    All info is from april 2001 ABJ and beekeeking at buckfast abbey.


    Clay- AHB, they been here since 1866!


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